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alstry (35.33)

9.09 MOAP #3 Concentric Contraction

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21

September 18, 2009 – Comments (33)

FHA running out of money

FDIC running out of money

Pension Guaranty running out of money

Federal, State, and Local Tax receipts evaporating

Anyone notice a trend???????

Soon you will learn that the American economy is a basically one customer one market economy.....The American Consumer.  As long as the American Consumer consumed, our economy boomed.  Initially we consumed because we produced a lot.....lately we consumed, because we borrowed a lot. 

In 9.09 you will learn that you can't convert a massive consumption economy dependent on leverage to a savings economy without MASSIVE economic and social upheaval.

Our entire economy is structured to serve massive numbers of people consuming massively.  Both components must be present in order to sustain America as we know it....we have massive numbers of retail outlets, massive numbers of banks, massive numbers of just about everything.  We have massive governments and massive numbers of government workers dependet on this massive infastructure paying massive property, income and sales taxes.  If we don't have massive numbers consuming, we can get rid of half the three quarters of what we have and still be able to accomodate our new lower demand.

Further, our incomes are predicted on massive consumption...most of us make between $30K and $300K because we consume massively.  If we are not consuming massively, than our incomes must be reduced to accomdate the lower consumption.  In many cases, at least 50-75%.  The problem is that most of us entered into mortgage contracts, property tax contracts and insurance contracts predicated on incomes in a consuption economy.  Such contracts are unaffordable in a savings economy as many simply can't afford their current expenses with lower incomes.

Alstrynomics has documented this process unfold over the past year.....now things are accellerating as more jobs are being cut, few are being hired, and savings and credit is being cut off and depleted rapidly.  We are not too far of before the system collapases because too few will be able fulfill contractural obligations and we will face unprecedented defaults as we moprh into a savings economy.

Benny knows this, Timmy knows this and now you know this as Wall Street is the only one being bailed out during this convulsive process.

33 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On September 18, 2009 at 11:08 AM, awallejr (83.77) wrote:

And time ran out for your prediction that DOW will be 5000-2000 by end of summer, unless you truly think it will drop 4800-7800 points today.  So for all your "factual" arguments as to why it should have happened, with all your 9.09  and your moap hpe by end of summer, the emperor truly wears no clothes.

And when you used to counter my arguments in the past with your score points versus mine, well as I predicted you are well on your way to turning negative and thus >20 assuming you don't make any serious moves.

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#2) On September 18, 2009 at 11:14 AM, alstry (35.33) wrote:

awa...you will eventually learn....when the government has no money.....you have no money....no matter what the DOW resides at.

 

And I will be more than willing to aknowledge that the DOW did not go to my predicted level....but in the end...it will be a difference without a distinction......

Enjoy the moment...it won't be relevant very soon.

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#3) On September 18, 2009 at 11:14 AM, booyahh (< 20) wrote:

seriously man, alstry you totally got Bernanke'd ...

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#4) On September 18, 2009 at 11:22 AM, alstry (35.33) wrote:

Actually, these people got Bernanked:

Hawaii - Even with Budget Cuts, Furlough.. Still plans to layoff more than 1,100 workers in November

Sony's Terre Haute Facility - 30

Air Jamaica - Layoffs coming

City of Aspen - 12

Boeing - 250

City of Cape Coral - 46

National Refrigeration Company - 60 Layoffs , Even possible Closure

AbitibiBowater ( International ) - 1,500

Ventura County - 3

JP Morgan Chase - 43

Southgate's Education First Credit Union - Voluntary Layoffs?

Nortel Canada - 400 Face Layoffs

Mattel - < 80

GE Lexington Plant - 43 Layoffs Effective Sept. 28

California to cut Prisons Programs - Layoffs Coming

Update: Morley Companies Inc - 100 Layoffs 

Home Depot - New Orleans , Baton Rouge , Houston -  Layoffs at 3 stores  

Verizon - More Wireline Jobs to be cut

The University of North Carolina System - 900

Mahoning County Job's and Family Services - More Layoffs Coming?

Update: San Francisco Chronicle - 5

Nortel - Job Cuts Expect to Grow

Ohio American Energy Brilliant Mines - 115

City of LA begins Layoffs

Fisher Price - 20 

Tulsa Public Schools - Teacher Layoffs a Strong Possibility

NBC News - Layoffs Coming?

Update: New Hampshire - If no Agreement, Layoff Notices  by Oct 8

AeroFlot ( International ) - 2,000

Cameco ( International ) - 79

Update: Clark County - Layoffs very Possible

Riviera Beach - 4 Firefighters

University of California Berkeley - Layoffs?

Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula - 12+

AOL - 2

Philadelphia Police Brace for Possible Layoffs 

D.C Schools Face Larger Class Sizes and Layoffs

City of Oviedo - 11 

Mother's Cookies - 77

Benton Franklin Health District - 8

Warren County Proposes - 22 Layoffs

Ice Cream Club

Chemtura Corp Closing Plant

Room's Express closing 2 California Locations

Farmhouse Bakery in Statesville NC

Gracie Rae's Children Boutique 

Scott-Randall Designer Showroom

Rockwell Collins to close San Jose Division

Skyline Homes Inc

Ecology Store in Nashville Tennessee 

Lucite Plant At Dupont Beaumont Industrial Park

Planned Parenthood in Kirksville?

St Nicholas Social Club 

Benchmark Electronics to close Beaverton Plant

Update: ThyssenKrupp to Close Waupaca Plant - 276 layoffs

Krispy Kreme closed Half Dallas Area Location in Last 3 Months

Synovate Closing Nov. 15th

Delphi Plant in Mississippi to close by End of Year 

HanesBrand Inc to Close Ponce Plant in Puerto Rico

Coletta's Lamp and Shades

Men's Warehouse closing West Chester Distribution Center - 105 Job Losses Resulting 

7 Martini Lounges in Stark County Closes

Update: Nelson Building and Development Inc

The Ashley Restaurant in Downtown Stuart

Doughboy's Doughnuts

Splash Down 

Hanesbrand Inc Closes Facility in NC

Roth Carpet 

Joseph's Hardware in Hingham Square

Hacketts store in Potsdam

Herrell's Ice Cream Shop

Lee's Famous Recipe Chicken in Rock Hill SC

Sergent's Golden Living to close 

Collier Clark shuts Down 6 Satellite Offices - 46 Out of Work

Virginia Welcome Center Interstate 66 in Manassas

Hamburger Joe's in NC

State of Washington Closes 4 Department of Licensing Offices

Benjamin Moore's Strongsville Distribution Center

Schneider National Closing 2 Centers ( Green Bay , Seville Ohio ) - 100 Jobs Lost

Greenwood TV & Appliances Closing

Russell Brands to close Columbus Distribution Center - 112 Layoffs  

A&H Windows Company in Wilkesboro - 60 Job Losses

Splash Kitchen and Bath Store

Bar Louie Closes at Westgate City Center

The Luby's Cafeteria 

Cooper Wiring Devices in Brunswick to close within a year

The Metro Grocery Store in Parry Sound Mall

Naked Kingfish Restaurant in NC 

Anderson Inc to close Lima Ohio Store in Nov.

Jim Moore Cadillac 

The County Buffet in Oneonta 

El Paso Grill & Bar-B-Que in Farmington 

Sukons Kids Furniture 

Palmer Ford Dealership

R.J. Gator's Florida Sea Grill & Bar

Oracle State Park closed to Public - 30 layoffs 

Neely's Wholesale Supply Inc

MEMC to close O'Fallon Plant By June 2010 - 240 Layoffs Resulting

Borders ( International ) Closing its Books Etc Store

Driver Licensing Office in Tacoma closing

Baltimore-Washington Airport Communication Center closing - 8 layoffs

Dollar / Thrifty to close more locations 

VodaFone to Reduced Exchanges from 48 to 2

Gladys Young Closing Car Dealership 

Corsicana Window Factory closing by Sept 25

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#5) On September 18, 2009 at 11:23 AM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:

FDIC to consider ways to replenish deposit fund

Federal Housing Administration faces cash squeeze

OKLAHOMA CITY -- Oklahoma financial officials ordered Tuesday another 5 percent across-the-board cut in budget allocations to state agencies after state Treasurer Scott Meacham said tax revenue fell by more than 31 percent in August -- the eighth consecutive monthly decline in collections.

Preliminary reports show General Revenue Fund collections last month totaled $335.2 million. That is $154.9 million, or 31.6 percent, below collections in August 2008 and $131.3 million, or 28.2 percent, below the estimate.

For the first two months of the fiscal year, collections total $672 million, Meacham said. That is $275.3 million, or 29.1 percent, below the prior year and $209.7 million, or 23.8 percent, below the estimate.

As stock investors turn their focus to earnings prospects for the second half and 2010, they are zeroing in on one of the market's biggest challenges: lackluster corporate revenue.

The market barreled ahead this summer and is hovering near its high for the year, fueled in large part by stronger than-expected second-quarter earnings. But a significant driver of the good news was cost cutting. Many companies posted disappointing sales.

"You can not simply cut costs forever to have sustainable earnings. You need revenues to grow them over time," says Dirk Van Dijk, chief equity strategist at Zacks Investment Research. However, "it's going to be really, really tough" to increase revenue in the current economy, he says.

Sales among companies in the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index fell 16% in the second quarter from a year earlier, following a 14% decline in the first quarter.

http://finance.yahoo.com/retirement/article/107631/can-ra......=

 

Combine this:
$12.1 trillion debt cap

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Congress has raised the debt ceiling four times in the past two years and will probably have to do it again in the next month.

With the government borrowing record amounts of money, the nation's current debt ceiling of $12.1 trillion will be pierced soon.

That ceiling is the cap on how much the country allows itself to have in debt. In credit card parlance, the ceiling is the U.S. credit limit. At the end of August, U.S. debt totaled $11.8 trillion. That's roughly $349 billion shy of the statutory limit.

The ceiling is meant to serve as a brake on spending because lawmakers would have to think very seriously before they breach the limit and take a very difficult political vote to do so. In reality, lawmakers really don't have a choice but to raise the ceiling and they know it.

Put simply, if they don't raise the ceiling, the country will go into default on its debt. The domino effect would be painful, to say the least.

 

With this and how do we pay our debts?

Foreign demand for long-term US securities falls Foreign demand for long-term US securities falls in July; China boosts its holdings

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Foreign demand for long-term U.S. financial assets fell in July, but China boosted its holdings, the Treasury Department said Wednesday.

Foreigners purchased $15.3 billion more assets than they sold in July. Still, that's a steep decline from June, when they purchased $90.7 billion more than they sold.

The Treasury is auctioning record amounts of debt to cover a budget deficit it estimates will hit $1.58 trillion this year. Some economists worry that if overseas buyers don't keep buying U.S. debt, interest rates could rise.

With consumers and businesses demanding less credit in the recession, Treasury's increased borrowing has not created problems in the broader credit markets, IHS Global Insight economist Brian Bethune wrote in a note to clients. But that could change if deficits continue to soar during an economic recovery.

"We could see a sharp clash between increased demand for credit in the private sector and persistently high funding requirements from the Treasury," Bethune wrote.

WASHINGTON — Household income fell sharply and poverty rates rose in 2008 as the severe effects of the recession took their toll on Americans' finances, the Census Bureau reported Thursday.

Median household income dropped 3.6% to $50,303 in 2008, the bureau reported. That was the sharpest drop since at least 1967 and sent income to its lowest point since 1997.

http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/2009-09-10-census-healthcare_N.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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#6) On September 18, 2009 at 11:27 AM, prose976 (< 20) wrote:

Let's all allow Alstry to fade quietly, evaporate like the morning mist, like he said he would IF his prophecies were found to be inaccurate.

JUST DON'T ADD COMMENTS TO ANY MORE ALSTRY POSTS AND MAYBE HE'LL GO AWAY.

BTW Alstry, Someone is bound to register www.alstry.com, www.alstrynomics.com, www.zombulator.com if you don't.  I mean, if your rhetoric has any staying power.  Why don't you put your money where your mouth is (unless your shorts have drained your pool and your options expired like the milk in your fridge).  Just poking fun. :)

You can visit www.godaddy.com to register those domains pretty cheaply.

Good Luck!

Fool on!

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#7) On September 18, 2009 at 11:31 AM, alstry (35.33) wrote:

prosec...there will be nothing fun about this......

suicides are rising rapidly right now....so are domestic assaults....we are seeing tension rising rapidly across the nation as more and more get Zombulated....

If we continue with the same policies......you will witness something few could have ever imagined in America.....

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#8) On September 18, 2009 at 11:32 AM, awallejr (83.77) wrote:

"And I will be more than willing to aknowledge that the DOW did not go to my predicted level"

It isn't a question of you being "willing to acknowledge."  It's a fact.  For the last seven months you were scaring people out of the market, and even playing some kind "psycho suspense" drama with your whole 9.09/moap theme.  And I do recall your saying if your MOAP doesn't come true you will fade into the sunset.

I am not asking you to do that, but to just stop with the daily spamming.  But then again, an honorable person would keep his/her word.

And when your points turn negative and your score goes >20 will you acknowledge that you don't know what you are talking about?  Afterall you used that line on others when they disagreed with you.

 

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#9) On September 18, 2009 at 11:32 AM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:

Jobless rate tops 12% in 5 states

It's not getting better guys, the market is dilusional. 

The market is hitting its highest notes, may stocks hitting 52 week highs...you can't tell me in this economic environment that these prices are sustainable.

U.S. still in recession - CNN poll

Some clouds in housing report

However, the hype over the economy, everyone, and I mean EVERYONE being bullish is concerning me.  I'm not falling into the trap and jumping in, I sold in Aug, and I must stay patient.  

Earnings season is coming, Oracle, Palm, Best Buy, and Blockbuster (i think) have all not hit their marks.  Expect that to continue in my honest opinion.

There is only so much you can cut from the top to make the bottom look better.

 

 

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#10) On September 18, 2009 at 11:41 AM, alstry (35.33) wrote:

jas....stock markets can only go up on crashing revenues and evaporating earning for so long.......

9.09 has a ways to go.......

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#11) On September 18, 2009 at 11:44 AM, alstry (35.33) wrote:

42 states lose jobs in August, up from 29 in July

When enough are not working.....few will be buying..........

If few are buying....it is not the end of the world.....just the end of the world as you know it....

And if there is no money to pay the over 21,000,000 government workers and over 100,000,000 dependent on welfare, social security, food stamps, and unemployment........well....you will see.

 

Reality on sucks when you are forced to live in it......enjoy the matrix for now.

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#12) On September 18, 2009 at 11:51 AM, Deepfryer (27.58) wrote:

"awa...you will eventually learn....when the government has no money.....you have no money....no matter what the DOW resides at.

And I will be more than willing to aknowledge that the DOW did not go to my predicted level....but in the end...it will be a difference without a distinction......"

I seem to recall that you promised to never blog again if your prediction didn't come true before the end of summer. And we all know you're a man of your word... right?

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#13) On September 18, 2009 at 11:54 AM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:

Not that long.

I don't think reality is going to hit the market until November.

My shorts by then will be crushed, but we'll see I guess.

I sold some yesterday, thank god.

Market is irrational, gotta say that.  Although there are still some deals that I'm waiting to get into.  I know the stocks I want, they are just way over priced.  I've looked at over 200 stocks, all of which are at their highest levels going back to last year before the crash. 

I'm not chasing prices, there is just no value in the market, unless some people have suggestions.  Most of the suggestions I've seen are like LVS...highly risky considering Vegas is GIVING away trips to get people to come.

No one is traveling, no one is buying non-necessities, even me and my friends have cut back on going out, and we are some night life fiends!  We throw more parties and buy alcohol and food than we ever have before.

When I go shopping, I don't even go to the regular priced items, I go directly to the clearance items.  This is what everyone is doing.

 

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#14) On September 18, 2009 at 11:54 AM, ikkyu2 (99.33) wrote:

We all got Bernanke'd.  If you're not feeling it, you're not paying attention to that part of your anatomy. 

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#15) On September 18, 2009 at 11:56 AM, awallejr (83.77) wrote:

"everyone, and I mean EVERYONE being bullish is concerning me."

That would concern me too, but I still read and watch an awful lot of bearish articles and commentators.  Which is good.

Next 2 earnings quarters will be important.  Revenues have to start to increase.  And if they do you can see the market going much higher. 

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#16) On September 18, 2009 at 12:00 PM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:

@deepfryer

I want him to keep blogging, I actually enjoy reading the other side of the aile.

If you don't have all perspectives, you can't make a valued judgement about the overall direction of the economy, thus you are not TOTALLY informed.

I'm seeing long term the country needs to adapt, more manufacturing, more R&D of technologies for green energy, etc etc.

I dunno

Putin says US debt out of control

IT IS!

 

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#17) On September 18, 2009 at 12:22 PM, russiangambit (29.22) wrote:

> Let's all allow Alstry to fade quietly, evaporate like the morning mist, like he said he would IF his prophecies were found to be inaccurate.

People trying to put down alsty and  rejoice at the recovery don't see the forest for the trees.

We are doing exactly what Japan did 20 years ago. And people like Larry Summers where advising them  to just rip the bandaid off for their own good. They couldn't do it. Now we cannot do it for the same reasons.

Read this article about our similarities with Japan.

http://seekingalpha.com/article/162275-stimuluszilla-killed-japan-and-is-heading-our-way

Alstry is right, when the latest bubble collapses around our ears, whether it is now or 5 years from now you will not care whether alstry keeps blogging or not.

 

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#18) On September 18, 2009 at 1:32 PM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:

10 Big Companies That Are Veering Toward Bankruptcy

 

From The Business Insider, Sept. 18, 2009:

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp may need to borrow from the US Treasury to replenish its deposit insurance fund, Chairman Sheila Bair said after a speech in Washington DC today.

The FDIC is supposed to be able to "pay for itself" through assessments on insured banks. But with 92 banks having failed so far this year, the fund is in need of its own capital injection. As it turns out, the FDIC was also undercapitalized and dependent on good times to remain flush.

The proper thing to do would probably have been to increase bank assessments during good times to build up a healthy fund. But as with bank reserve requirements, no one thought of adopting a counter-cyclical policy until it was too late.

Now the FDIC is threatening to increase assessments, or even force banks to prepay future assessments. But this is difficult to do while bank lending remains anemic and banks face serious capital constrains.

"Ms. Bair appeared cautious about resorting to the Treasury credit line, saying there are different views on when it should be used. She said some believe it should be reserved for emergencies only, rather than for covering losses that are already known," the Wall Street Journal reports.

 

 

 

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#19) On September 18, 2009 at 1:43 PM, ChannelDunlap (< 20) wrote:

I love how the people who have been consistently wrong are the ones telling those who have been even partially right that they're missing something.  The ones who were right are the stupid ones.  Yeah, makes a lot of sense.  Enjoy your losses.

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#20) On September 18, 2009 at 1:55 PM, russiangambit (29.22) wrote:

> I love how the people who have been consistently wrong are the ones telling those who have been even partially right that they're missing something

By consitently wrong, you mean last 3 months? Yeah, I've been wrong last 3 months because I underestimated how irresponsible our government is.

My point is, it is not about who is right or wrong but about where we collectively end up together. When a ship goes down, everybody goes down, whether they are right or wrong.

If you are right and everything is good and getting even better, then great, we'll all prosper. But somehow I doubt it.

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#21) On September 18, 2009 at 2:07 PM, booyahh (< 20) wrote:

"We all got Bernanke'd.  If you're not feeling it, you're not paying attention to that part of your anatomy. "

so tragic, another loser that missed the rally.

btw several studies have shown that people who are depressed generally make less money in life

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#22) On September 18, 2009 at 2:19 PM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:

Well I didn't miss the rally and timed it pretty well, started on March 11th, and I'm EXTREMELY bearish.  I won't touch the stock market right now.  

Sold everything 2nd week of Aug.

Shorted in chunks as the dow/nasdaq components went up.

Losing 13% of my money so far shorting.

I made 50% so still playing with houses money.

When I get down to 20% of my winnings gone, I'll cut my losses and be happy with being up 30%.  good year over all, and tried somethign risky..but its ok.

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#23) On September 18, 2009 at 2:22 PM, Tacomatight (74.45) wrote:

#17) On September 18, 2009 at 12:22 PM, russiangambit (96.01) wrote:

"We are doing exactly what Japan did 20 years ago."

Hey man, you are completely wrong about this. The Japanese economic "miracle" was founded on a corrupt relationship between government, banks and the Zaibatsu(wiki it). There is absolutely no parallel you can draw here. Don't be like the Tardulator and talk out of your arse.

 

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#24) On September 18, 2009 at 2:31 PM, russiangambit (29.22) wrote:

> Hey man, you are completely wrong about this. The Japanese economic "miracle" was founded on a corrupt relationship between government, banks and the Zaibatsu(wiki it).

Corrupt relationship between government, banks and oligarchs? Hmm. Where did I hear this recently I wonder.

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#25) On September 18, 2009 at 2:36 PM, Tacomatight (74.45) wrote:

#22) On September 18, 2009 at 2:19 PM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:"Well I didn't miss the rally and timed it pretty well, started on March 11th, and I'm EXTREMELY bearish."

 What in all that is holy does this mean? So you timed it eh? Then that means you bought heavy when all the punks on this site were ranting and instead you made mad bank? Really? Did you really jason2713? I have a feeling you are just trying to fit in. If you did time the rally and are up over 50% minimum, I'd think you'd have a differnet persuasion. I know I do...you just don't seem to fit in with us guys who aren't nursing our broken egos and shouting it's the end of the damned world. You can't have it both ways brother.

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#26) On September 18, 2009 at 2:43 PM, Tacomatight (74.45) wrote:

russiangambit,

 "Corrupt relationship between government, banks and oligarchs? Hmm. Where did I hear this recently I wonder."

I don't know what your comment means. This doesnt make any sense. You didn't answer what I just said. Calling the American government oligachs(which I assume is your implication) is what folks do at the Cafe' court at junior college. I clearly stated that there is no comparison with Japan and the United States. You didn't answer what I said. Like I said use wikkipedia and find out what a Zaibatsu is. Sorry, I usually don't weigh in on the BS that is pumped by many of the blogs on Fool, but I'm bored.

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#27) On September 18, 2009 at 3:09 PM, russiangambit (29.22) wrote:

Tacomatight, zaibatsu is oligarchs, not the US government. May be you need to look up the definition.

> Calling the American government oligachs(which I assume is your implication) is what folks do at the Cafe' court at junior college

As for the US government, there are plenty of people there, and I don't paint them all with the same brush. However, I do say that US government as a whole is ineffective, often incompetent, covers up the truth, refuses to acknowledge unflattering truth, kicks can down the road  and lies when need be.

You say that there is no  "Corrupt relationship between government and banks" in the US? I believe exactly the opposite. This is why we similar to Japan. The banks were let off the hook, they are hiding the losses off the balance sheet, they don't write off toxic assets,  they are trying to earn their way out of the hole, exactly like in Japan. Politicians owe too muchs to the banks and therefore don't touch them. If you don't see the similarities, you are welcome to your opinion. And I see no reason why I can't state mine.

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#28) On September 18, 2009 at 3:13 PM, jason2713 (< 20) wrote:

@taco

If you don't see how the gov't is in bed with the banks, you're blind.

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#29) On September 18, 2009 at 3:17 PM, Tacomatight (74.45) wrote:

No wrong. 1) Zaibatsu does not mean oligarch.

"As for the US government, there are plenty of people there, and I don't paint them all with the same brush. However, I do say that US government as a whole is ineffective, often incompetent, covers up the truth, refuses to acknowledge unflattering truth, kicks can down the road  and lies when need be. "

After this quote I see that you are a member of the Tardulator's group of groupies known as 'Tard-Fest.' ( I coined this so don't rip me off).You keep postin with your leader and I'm gonna keep making money.

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#30) On September 18, 2009 at 3:25 PM, russiangambit (29.22) wrote:

Zaibatsu does not mean oligarch.  - whatever, you find the right English word then. This is the closest equivalent of the same phenomena outside of Japan.

 

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#31) On September 18, 2009 at 3:26 PM, russiangambit (29.22) wrote:

>  phenomena

phenomenon.

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#32) On September 18, 2009 at 8:09 PM, runningdonut (< 20) wrote:

We need more from the bears than a return to fundamentals argument on endless loop. The sky has been falling for almost 3 months now. Fighting the relentless worldwide stimulus effort looks like a losing battle more each day. As money on the outside looking in got sucked in those who capitulated in August or earlier were rewarded along with them. The stubborn ones get louder as they get grumpier, still refusing to even acknowledge a possibility for more upside.

There were and are too many skeptics as earnings and employment data continue to push the market higher. The path of least resistance and momentum remain to the upside.This summer fear makes you weak while others get rich.

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#33) On September 18, 2009 at 10:13 PM, checklist34 (99.71) wrote:

alstry, time is running out for 9/09

what happens on 10/1/09 if no market crash, no war, no evidence of societies imminent demise materializes in 9/09?

 

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