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All this talk about loading up on canned food is a joke

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March 31, 2009 – Comments (48)

I made a few modifications to my house this weekend.  Pretty sweet huh?  I'm all set for armageddon.

I have seen a number of articles out there, even one right here at TMF, which advise people to load up on canned food, bottled water, weapons, etc and to move out into the wilderness because social unrest is coming.  You have got to be kidding me.  Articles like this hurt this site's credibility.  Why bother reading about investing if you think that things are going to get that bad because every investment outside of flashlights, batteries, generators, and cool ninja swords are going to be completely worthless.

Does anyone realize that unemployment in the United States was four times higher than it is right now less than 100 years ago and there wasn't anything even close to prolonged, widespread violence?  I'm about as pessimistic about the current state of the economy as anyone I know and I still think that all this talk about loading up on canned food, etc is absurd.  Do I think that one should have a huge reserve of cash on hand in case they lose their job?  Absolutely.  I'm in the process of increasing the size of my cash reserve right now.  I also am moving my investments to the top of the capital structure, bonds, rather than common stock.  Do I think that society as we currently know it will cease to exist?  Give me a break.

Deej

48 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On March 31, 2009 at 11:25 AM, dudemonkey (39.48) wrote:

Thank you for this refreshing breath of reason.  I was getting tired of seeing the "stock up on guns and ammo and get ready to shoot Super Mutants that are coming 4 U!!!!" stuff.  This post makes me wish I could Rec something more than once. 

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#2) On March 31, 2009 at 11:26 AM, johnnyluvsbeachs (64.21) wrote:

Which company owns the patent on Sharks with Lasers?

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#3) On March 31, 2009 at 11:27 AM, dividendhound (< 20) wrote:

I like the creativity in this diagram.  However, you are standing a little close to your landmines in the picture. 

I do like the tigers acting as a surprise to catch complacent people who have made it past your food.  Some Indiana Jones style traps on the gold will take it to the next level.  If your house looks like enough other people's houses are going to look like, there could soon be a bull market in tiger importers and landscapers with moat qualifications, which is an often overlooked market.

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#4) On March 31, 2009 at 11:28 AM, Paxtor (28.78) wrote:

Not bad, except when someone steps on a mine it might blow a hole for the laser-shark filled moat to drain into your basement.

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#5) On March 31, 2009 at 11:30 AM, Paxtor (28.78) wrote:

I also like to see how Deej never got caught up in the credit bubble.  Even though he has billions of dollars worth of gold, he still lives in a modest bungalo.

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#6) On March 31, 2009 at 11:43 AM, devoish (98.56) wrote:

The world has passed peak tiger. Resources are almost completely depleted. Will a tiger investment still roar, or would I be grabbing the tail?

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#7) On March 31, 2009 at 11:51 AM, XMFSinchiruna (27.35) wrote:

Deej... to each their own, man. Where is the harm in being over-prepared? I will be delighted to never rely upon my own store of non-perishables, but I definitely sleep a little better having them

You speak very confidently in espousing your views that we will not see any interruption of availability of supplies nor infrastructure-crippling episodes of social unrest. I hope you're right, but I challenge your refutation of the possibility for such disruptions given the severity of the crisis we face. Acquiring a colection of basic supplies is more than a prudent course of action under the circumstances, and one need only look to the case of Iceland in 2008 for some indication of how quickly a currency crisis can turn into diminished availability of food supplies, for instance.

All these statements predicated upon the belief that "it can't happen here" have, in my opinion, already been refuted by the facts. I warned about the pitfalls of our debt-ridden fiat economic system for years, and all my allusions to cases like the Weimar experience were swiftly met ith statements like "it can't happen here". Unfortunately, it did happen here, and we cannot predict the consequences to the social order as this unfolds.

I have huge respect for you, Deej... I love your blog posts, which I read on a regular basis... and I even found your diagram above highly entertaining... :) ... but I urge you to keep an open mind with respect to the potential scenarios now unfolding, and at the very least to show your fellow Fools -- who may gain a greater sense of security by having some supplies on hand -- a greater measure of respect.

To each their own. In a best-case scenario, my canned goods will make their way to a soup kitchen once my concerns diminish, and no one will have been harmed in the process. One can indeed still buy stocks and still prepare for worst-case scenarios at the same time.

With great respect,

Christopher

TMFSinchiruna

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#8) On March 31, 2009 at 12:16 PM, TMFDeej (99.43) wrote:

Hey Sinch.  You know that I like the stuff that you write.  I read and rec your posts / articles all the time.  I completely agree that there's a lot not to like about the current state of the economy right now and it is very possible that the dollar will implode one day.

Articles that expose how messed up the economy is, talk about the greed / policies that got us to this point, talk about how gold and commodities could be great investments, talk about how a significant fall in the U.S. dollar may be coming or that how no one will ever be able to retire, etc...are all outstanding and very appropriate for a credible investment site like The Motley Fool. 

However, I think that publishing survivalist articles about the potential for massive civil unrest and widespread destruction and violence are at the very best beneath TMF and at worst irresponsible because they have the potential to create panic.  That stuff should be reserved for other non-investment related sites.  If things get to that point all of our investments will be worthless.

I apologize if I offended you.  That certainly was not my intent.  The pic that I posted was all in good fun, though I am completely serious when I say that I believe panic-causing survivalist articles are beneath TMF. 

Everyone has their own comfort level with what is happening right now.  To each their own.  I certainly am very concerned and I am taking action to build a cash reserve to protect my family in the event that myself or my wife lose their job for an extended period of time. 

I just don't see how our society will completely cease to exist any time soon.  If things do get that bad, I'll buy you a beer...but you'll have to share some of your canned baked beans with me ;).

Deej

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#9) On March 31, 2009 at 12:22 PM, Mary953 (77.81) wrote:

No, you have a few things wrong.  First, Trade your tigers for some dobermans.  They will be wonderful pets and will be very loving toward your family while still being able to rip apart anyone that you dislike. 

Second, I didn't see the manual can openers.  Be sure you have several along with lots of matches and some water filtration units.  Anything else?......... Oh yeah, telescopes on all sides to insure that no one is trying to get in (tie fake bushes on them and paint them brown so the bushes look like trees when you raise them to take a look), and of course, concertina wire, although I don't know exactly how you would use it or where.

Maybe you should just go rent the Addams Family TV series DVD's and watch what they did to protect - whatever they protected.  Love the diagram though.  Have you thought of applying for work at Fort Knox?

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#10) On March 31, 2009 at 12:24 PM, Wharrgarbl (52.42) wrote:

I think i fall somewhere in the middle here.  I can remember as a kid back in the 70's when everyone had a good month or two of canned goods, etc., thrown on the shelves in the basement.  Why?  Because back then we relied on ourselves and prepared for the minor inconveniences in life.

Nowadays, we lose power for a few days and the masses start to panic.  And that's because many people have stopped relying on themselves and now expect the government to come to the rescue.  And if you watched the news after Hurricane Katrina, Uncle Sam is not up to the job.

Having a couple hundred dollars worth of food/water/emergency supplies stashed away is nothing more than common sense and  acts as an insurance policy.  Angry tigers and sharks with lasers, well, those are only needed if you live in Detroit.

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#11) On March 31, 2009 at 12:31 PM, dudemonkey (39.48) wrote:

Second, I didn't see the manual can openers.

Hahaha.  That made me laugh at my desk.  I'm picturing Deej going down into his bunker during Armageddon with his piles of canned goods and looking around for a can opener only to realize he doesn't have one.  I can almost hear the "aw, frak" as the tigers start to get hungry ...

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#12) On March 31, 2009 at 12:36 PM, ralphmachio (24.57) wrote:

This sure won't be the first, and definitely not the last time someone with your view has voiced their opinion, which is contrary to mine.  The thing is, I've heard all the information that you base your opinion on, and you have not read the protocols of the learned elders of zion.  Plain and simple.  If you need any further material, I have equally compelling evidence, just ask.  Maybe watch zeitgeist for free on youtube.  the average american knows about as much about the way things are as they do about string theory.  The belief that you know something further hinders academic progress, as I sing about in my blues tune, "people I'm not impressed, by what you think you learned on TV", and unless you've lived closer than 5 houses away from me, no you've never heard it!

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#13) On March 31, 2009 at 12:43 PM, ClandUpods (< 20) wrote:

Rec. Good point. The world ending is not proper blog content for an investment site.

 

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#14) On March 31, 2009 at 12:48 PM, nottheSEC (78.93) wrote:

Really, Seriously this layout. Any proper villian knows that shark heads move around too much. They will eithier fry the gators,activate the mines, or expose the gold. Also tigers??That is SOOO 1970's . You already have the gators dig a deeper moat problem solved. J/k good stuff but in defference to , TMFSinchiruna and all this is good advice especially when there is a a sale p/u a dozen or so---->....Wharrgarbl (50.64) Having a couple hundred dollars worth of food/water/emergency supplies stashed away is nothing more than common sense and acts as an insurance policy. 

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#15) On March 31, 2009 at 12:50 PM, nottheSEC (78.93) wrote:

OOps did not read Paxtor (99.26) post good stuff. We agree on the shark thing. Maybe a coy pond to feed the shark. To each his own all best ....J

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#16) On March 31, 2009 at 12:58 PM, StatsGeek (29.17) wrote:

I rec'd your post because I really enjoyed the humorous drawing.  And I respect your opinion.  But of course I disagree.

During the Rodney King riots and Hurricane Katrina, there were more than 1,000 fires set by rioters and looters.  These things only take a tiny spark to turn into a towering inferno.  For you not to think that can happen here is naive, in my opinion.  A bank run or serious rioting would cause the store shelves to be cleared faster than you can say "panic".

Maybe you misunderstand the doom and gloomers a bit.  I don't think we'll be in a Mad Max situation where you can't get food ever again without stealing or growing it.  But I think it is highly likely that we will see rioting and stores' shelves will be cleared.  Look at it this way, even if it doesn't happen, you will be prepared for a natural disaster.  We had a 4.3 quake here in California yesterday, for example.

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#17) On March 31, 2009 at 1:02 PM, ralphmachio (24.57) wrote:

#13 ClandU- It is if you are profiting from it!  ;)

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#18) On March 31, 2009 at 1:05 PM, briyan (30.78) wrote:

I regularly see TMF articles that make me feel pretty sure there is no  real credibility on this site anyway.  Who is it that OKs this kind of garbage?

http://www.fool.com/investing/small-cap/2009/01/30/is-it-time-to-sell.aspx

 

http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2009/03/28/why-you-shouldnt-listen-to-jim-cramer.aspx 

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#19) On March 31, 2009 at 1:15 PM, russiangambit (29.12) wrote:

Well, here in Houston, we do get a glimpse of what life could be like during hurrcaines and it is not pretty. First of all , there is no gas or food to be had for a week or so. No electiricity, water is contaminated.

But, in all seriousness, we are nowhere near a disaster. If things do not improve for a couple of years, then I am planting a garden and digging a well. Water is the first thing one needs to survive. But again, by that time it will be an obivous thing to do. I doubt we'll ever get there. Buying guns is nonsense. Because if other countries are any example, the government will confiscate the guns at the first sign of social unrest , for our own good.

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#20) On March 31, 2009 at 1:15 PM, Toxin (25.23) wrote:

Aliens and the NWO are now in control of the the S&P.  This can be proved by taking the derivative of the high every day dividing that number by 54 subtracting 3 and taking the integral of Fermat's last theorem. They are trying to take over the Nasdaq but a group of blackops and Jack Bauer are holding them off right now.  Get to your bunkers and compounds as quickly as possible.

 

 

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#21) On March 31, 2009 at 1:24 PM, AnomaLee (28.50) wrote:

It not a good idea to look @ this for the first time in a library.


Personally, I'm always been sick of pants.

Oh, how I've dearly waited for a time when man could once again go back to loin cloths :)

Good luck with the sharks. I remember when I first got my own sharks with laser beams. It was like my dreams came true. They're a little fiesty at first, but just feed them twice a week and you'll be fine:

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#22) On March 31, 2009 at 1:27 PM, ralphmachio (24.57) wrote:

Uh, the black ops would be on the side of the NWO.  Don't you know anything?  I mean, really, dude.

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#23) On March 31, 2009 at 1:33 PM, XMFSinchiruna (27.35) wrote:

No offense taken, fellow Fool. I'm just sharing my opposite viewpoint on this issue.

Food is indeed an investment, since looming inflation alone could contribute to the difficulty in acquiring sufficient supply at some future point.

These are, at their core, economic concerns that become concerns for our families' well-being, and in that respect they certainly do have a rightful place here at TMF.

As for your comment about such discussions creating panic, I say hogwash, buddy. :) There is no need to panic as long as you prepare. :P

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#24) On March 31, 2009 at 1:53 PM, ByrneShill (73.92) wrote:

There is no need to panic as long as you prepare. :P

Sounds like Alstry just put his hand on a mind control device.

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#25) On March 31, 2009 at 1:53 PM, Jimmy2008 (< 20) wrote:

I agree with Sinchi. It is time to hope for the best but to prepare for the worst. It WILL cause panic if something bad happens but we are not prepared for it.

I am not ready yet to buy half a year dry food. I have bought some rice, flour, jam and alike. However, I watch new developments closely and am ready to buy more anytime.

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#26) On March 31, 2009 at 2:02 PM, Ph1sh55 (28.25) wrote:

"Does anyone realize that unemployment in the United States was four times higher than it is right now less than 100 years ago and there wasn't anything even close to prolonged, widespread violence?"

I think that is a bit simplistic.

Unemployment was 4 times higher at it's peak in the depression comparing to what unemployment figure of today?  Depending on what measure you compare it to, we may already be 14% currently.  But that's not really my main concern- it's that we have high unemployment yet we are early into this cycle.  70% of GDP is consumer based, a lot of jobs are serviced based built around this very same consumer credit bubble.  The concern is that once it begins unwinding there is little substance in our economy to keep it afloat.  

The main thing here though is the makeup of the average family.  During the depression many families had access to, or were farm based.  They weren't completely reliant on modern infrastructure as we are now.  Worse case, even if unemployed they could still feed their families.  You don't need to steal if you can still provide for your family.  The vast majority of people nowadays do not have the skills or the material means to feed themselves and families without modern infrastructure.  In fact many don't have any savings at all.

 "I'm about as pessimistic about the current state of the economy as anyone I know and I still think that all this talk about loading up on canned food, etc is absurd.  Do I think that one should have a huge reserve of cash on hand in case they lose their job?  Absolutely.  I'm in the process of increasing the size of my cash reserve right now.  I also am moving my investments to the top of the capital structure, bonds, rather than common stock.  Do I think that society as we currently know it will cease to exist?  Give me a break."

I don't really see a lot of substance in the rest of your post to defend the "it can't happen here" view.

I'm not going to give you a break because your dismissal is not rooted in anything other than the belief that it 'ain't gonna happen here'.  


 

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#27) On March 31, 2009 at 2:05 PM, Ph1sh55 (28.25) wrote:

And just to clarify, my view is not that I 'want' it to happen here, I just see it as a possibility that it is better to be prepared for than not.

It is definitely not a joke.

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#28) On March 31, 2009 at 2:41 PM, Jimmy2008 (< 20) wrote:

To Sinchi,

You have strongly suggested that people buy gold now. Gold is the lifeline. However, I like silver even more. Silver is cheaper. We can spend a 1-oz silver coin to buy bread. Silver has more industrial applications. Silver is undervalued based on gold/silver price ratio. Silver has more limited supply. Would you please explain it to us?

 

Thanks!

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#29) On March 31, 2009 at 2:47 PM, TMFDeej (99.43) wrote:

Ahhhhh, I thought that this post would generate a lot of discussion.  Thanks for reading and for commenting everyone.  I can't help it, I'm opinionated.

I completely agree that there's absolutely nothing wrong with being prepared for natural disasters and such, but I have come across so many articles written by people who believe that a Mad Max-like world straight out of the pages of Cormac McCarty's The Road will be upon us any day now.  That's just not going to happen.  If it does, chances are that there will be a lot of lead-time to enable everyone who doesn't already have canned goods stored up to get them.

Black Swans are all the rage right now, but as I always say the truth is usually somewhere in the middle.  We aren't headed for a nice, happy, V-shaped economic recovery in the second half of 2009 like many believe and this isn't the end of the world either.  The truth lies somewhere in between.  The recession will last longer than most optimists believe but it will be better than the living in caves scenario that the pessimists are looking for as well.

Deej

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#30) On March 31, 2009 at 2:51 PM, alstry (34.92) wrote:

I think you should all grab a tall Bloody and sit back and figure out what our government officials are going to impose upon us.....

Are they going to tax are houses and land to the point where they have little value....

Are they going to nationalize our retirement plans due to underfunding of pensions and Social Security.....

In the end......can we have unrest....sure......anything is possible......but if we do.......having enough food and guns will likely be ineffective.

Alstrynomics is all about being effective and making lots of money.....and hopefully not having it all taken away by the government.

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#31) On March 31, 2009 at 3:02 PM, TMEBenBenBen (< 20) wrote:

Statsgeek:

>>>'...During the Rodney King riots and Hurricane Katrina, there were more than 1,000 fires set by rioters and looters.  These things only take a tiny spark to turn into a towering inferno. ...'<<<</em>

While the California portion of your example is true, the Louisiana portion remains underwater.

I have heard that a tiny spark in California can easily turn into a towering inferno, somethign to do with dry sense of humor.  Louisiana is the farthest thing from dry that one can possibly get.  Throw in a moderate rainstorm, and good luck trying to light a fire under any establishment.

 

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#32) On March 31, 2009 at 3:21 PM, alstry (34.92) wrote:

You may want to take a look at the fires in the Fargo flood from a few years back......they were explosive!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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#33) On March 31, 2009 at 3:21 PM, RonChapmanJr (90.28) wrote:

Deej,

 You think that posts about being prepared are beneath TMF?  I frequently disagree with your opinions, but do not usually comment because you have some valid points mixed in.  In this case, I think your opinion and your presentation of it cause more damage than those of us who are telling people to buy canned food and guns.  If someone listens to us "doom and gloomers" at worst they have extra food they can give away.  If they listen to you and do not prepare, the worst scenario they face could be life threatening. 

Keep posting about how bonds will outperform stocks.  That is an area where people should give some thought to what you have written.  This is not.

ron

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#34) On March 31, 2009 at 3:23 PM, XMFSinchiruna (27.35) wrote:

ByrneShill

The wording was a nod to Alstry, as I've stated elsewhere, but I've been advocating some measure of practical preparation on TMF since 2007.

Jimmy2008

You're right, I advocate gold exposure as an important means of protection in this environment, but I have consistently offered silver as providing far more upside potential.

See my articles here, here, and here.

And my blog posts here, here, and here.

TMFDeej

I sure hope I'm wrong, but my gut tells me we're going to see a degree of strife and resulting disruptions to the status quo that will include some measure of a breakdown. I'm not predicting Mad Max, but I feel the future will be tipped a bit closer to that end of the spectrum rather than the societal soft landing you seem to foresee.

Someday let's have a beer and discuss at length why I hold these concerns. 

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#35) On March 31, 2009 at 3:55 PM, tonylogan1 (28.00) wrote:

statsgeek and ph1sh55 are right on.

I think preparedness mindset comes down to how prepared you want to be

I for one, have spiked shoulderpads in my garage, becuase they tend to be difficult to get in an emergency...but I digress

For the average joe, I think it is wise to advocate preparing to be able to survive without outside support for at least a month.

The only value I see in storing enough food for a year, is that you will be able to support 24 of your neighbors or drop in family for two weeks if there is any short-term emergency. This is far from the worst course of action you can take.

Having a deep freezer and food storage also tends to make you eat healthier and cheaper. You no longer order pizzas, becuase you know that you have a ton of food available. You can buy in bulk and there is plenty to be saved by that alone.

There is plenty of value to having firearms and being properly trained, however I agree there is not much value to starting your own backyard militia. There are very few scenarios where that is a worthwhile endevour. 

The comparisons to 100 years ago are obviously outdated. There are too many reasons to list why a massive earthquake in Southern California would result in more violence and death than would have occurred 100 years ago...

I still gave a rec, becuase the picture made me laugh out loud...

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#36) On March 31, 2009 at 5:37 PM, whereaminow (< 20) wrote:

I agree in the sense that giving fantastic predictions of societal collapse is counter-productive. Providing analysis, pointing out problems, and offering solutions that aim at peaceful change before it is too late, however, is commendable.

David in Qatar

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#37) On March 31, 2009 at 5:54 PM, ThoughtfulFool (< 20) wrote:

"Does anyone realize that unemployment in the United States was four times higher than it is right now less than 100 years ago and there wasn't anything even close to prolonged, widespread violence?"

 

I hate to depress folks, but I have to disagree with this statement.  Unfortunately, we live in different times; our culture has changed, at least in the USA, and not for the better, IMO.  We generally trust each other less, are suspicious of each other, don't know our neighbors, think bad things of people we don't know as our default opinion, fill in the blanks with negative things for things we do not know about someone...we are lacking in thoughtful courteousy and friendliness to those we pass in our daily lives...we put ourselves first.  When we think of the 1950s and try to compare now to then, we often seem to have trouble searching for the descriptive words and just say that things "were simpler" then.  In truth, I believe that we have become a paranoid, fearful society.  And, when threatened (whether real or perceived), what does a paranoid person do?  They have strong and exaggerated overreactions.  Sorry to have to display my pessimistic view of the world, but, in my opinion, THIS is why our reaction to survival threats will be so much more severe now than it would have been 50+ years ago.

After rereading, also am sorry if sound a bit preachy - it's just something that I hold a strong opinion regarding.

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#38) On March 31, 2009 at 6:11 PM, bostoncelitcs (37.24) wrote:

Right now we are fighting wars on two fronts and our military is stretched to the breaking point.  You forgot the generator...I like Honda's (HMC) and the gasoline storage in your diagram!!

Things do not look good.

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#39) On March 31, 2009 at 7:47 PM, AnomaLee (28.50) wrote:

We are going through strucutral changes on a global scale. There will be many challenges, but it's not going to be armageddon. I've read a few posts from some eccentrics who probably believe they can somehow prepare to be the key protagonist of earth that will survive the coming end times because they have some canned goods and know how to shoot a rifle when it's doubtful that most Americans could even run a couple miles.

[Moving on] A few food shortages I remember recently in the U.S. were during the Y2K craze and after the power outage that affected the entire Northeast of the country in 2003. If you're unable to maintain enough food to last at least a week whether it be due to personal or financial reasons then perhaps you have things to work on that are just as [but likely more] important than being on a financial site. It's always a good idea to be preapared.

Yes, carry a flashlight so that you're prepared when it's dark, but there's no need to think the boogie man is really going to come and get you when the sun goes down.

Also, for the growing populatioin of financial eccentrics here: It's much more practical to have a DC-AC converter that you can use through your car instead of an immobile generator. This way you can maintain electronic readiness and mobility. This will come in handy when you're unable to access the panic room inside your nuclear fallout shelter.

Thank you Deej for the funny post.


TMFSinchiruna
The basis of Iceland's economy is not even 80% comparable to the U.S.

The FIRE economy was a much larger potion of Iceland's economy, and their current account was beginning to swallow their economy while the U.S. CA is likely to continue to shrink

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#40) On March 31, 2009 at 8:06 PM, Shallow1 (< 20) wrote:

   You Got to admit, its kinda fun to think the worst of times is here. It never hurts to be pepaired for anything that may come your way, keep in mind our gov. probably would'nt be able to help much if there really was a serious melt down.

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#41) On March 31, 2009 at 8:44 PM, cwcj63 (69.54) wrote:

i hope polishing all these bullets is worth it because if it's not i'm going to be upset .just kidding i think it's going to be a long haul before we get out of this mess.it's great don't you think.

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#42) On March 31, 2009 at 9:13 PM, redneckdemon (< 20) wrote:

One might also want to consider that much of our military are expecting to get paid. 

If the green backs loose their value, most of us won't be willing to turn on our own people, even if the higher-ups tell us it's "For their own good.". 

If I stop getting paid, I'm taking my guns and going back home.  Thanks to the hurricanes, us Gulf Coast types STAY prepared now days.

Pretty much everyone in my home town keeps at least one gun and some ammo, and most of us hunt during deer season.  Care to guess how much looting took place when we lost power and phone lines for a month?  If you said "none", you win some internets!

Maybe thats not entirely true.  My father, his brother, and many other folks living closer to the middle of town work for the county.  A few hours after the storm had passed, they staged a mass raid of the County Barn (where all the bulldozers, back-hoes, road graders, etc. are stored) and temporarily stole them.  In less than 24 hours, all major roads linking our town with our neighbors (the closest being some 15 miles away) where completely clear of downed trees, powerlines, and anything else obstructing travel.

Anyone who couldn't drive a bulldozer but owned a chainsaw formed into loosly organized groups and road along behind them, cutting any trees blocking people in their homes and yards, making sure everyone was ok.

By the time the county sheriff made in to town, all the equipment had been returned, and he found a bunch of us staging a mass BBQ to feed the town.  This happened daily, until the national Guard and Army Reserve arrived with MREs, ice, and bottled water.

My point is, being prepared is just about the smartest thing you can do, reguardless of the economy.  Heading for the hills, I don't see the point of, unless your community will be more of a threat than an ally.  Case in point: New Orleans.  What was that about civil unrest?

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#43) On April 01, 2009 at 9:06 AM, OldEnglish (27.99) wrote:

You're right about food storage; beyond a few days is a waste. It's useful for a natural disaster but the last thing to go will be food stamps. However, societies change with regards to social norms. Crime was very low during the Great Depression. Take a walk through Detroit if you think it's still the 1930's. Last time I was in Detroit, and this was a few years ago, "Escape From New York" came to mind.

America's major cities will disintegrate into Detroit-like conditions if there is another depression. As Redneck pointed out above, the less than prepared populace of New Orleans could have done with a few cans of tuna and 9mm rounds.

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#44) On April 01, 2009 at 10:06 AM, Timh0rt0n (95.29) wrote:

Anyone one compares this to the great depression really does know what they are talking about. To say that they were better off because they lived on farms and could grow food for themselves does not really understand the situation many people faced at the time. Many of the people of that day made similar mistakes to what has occurred today. They borrowed against their farms. The droughts came and they could not grow a crop to sell or feed themselves. The banks for closed on their mortgages and they lost their farms. When these people were forced into the cities there were no jobs for them. There was no social security network for them to fall back on that there is today. They were starving.

 

This caused mass migrations to happen and the states that were taking in these people did not want them. The poor become an under class and were chased around by land owners and police like animals. (Not that this is not happening today)

 

Anyway food production today is not under threat, and there is help from a social network that did not exist in the past. Also, the government working hard to address the problems. Yes, they make mistakes but they are at least trying. So chicken little’s, either cry and hide in the basement or do what all great people do in times of difficulty. Look for new and greater opportunities.

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#45) On April 01, 2009 at 10:13 AM, XMFSinchiruna (27.35) wrote:

Wow... methinks some Fools are in for a rude awakening. I found the replies to this post most curious. Deej... thanks for posting, and as I said I really did get a kick out of the picture!

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#46) On April 01, 2009 at 11:34 AM, philippalmer (76.67) wrote:

Is your house really military green with a brown roof?  Very camoflauge-esk.

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#47) On April 01, 2009 at 5:55 PM, bostoncelitcs (37.24) wrote:

Bobby Jindal's gonna save us should we have civil unrest in the Gulf States.................April FOOLS!!

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#48) On April 01, 2009 at 10:41 PM, edbbear (< 20) wrote:

If rampant inflation hits there will be enough warning to go hit the store for more food.  If it gets to the point where you need your own gun to protect yourself then a gun really won't help your standard of living much. 

That said, I think it makes perfect sense to be prepared for the future.  It's premature to run out and stock up on canned goods (which I personally wouldn't want to eat unless I had to).  The better idea is to invest in commodities to protect yourself from potential inflation or food shortages. 

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