Use access key #2 to skip to page content.

Another LED Bulb

Recs

15

October 08, 2009 – Comments (13)

So I was at the local Kroger and while wandering around, I noticed that they were carrying LED lightbulbs. Now if you remember my post a few months ago, an LED replacement for a 65 watt flood bulb in a canister proved less than satisfactory mostly due to the light being much too blue and directional.

But what caught my eye was an LED bulb that claimed to be a replacement for the 40 watt candelabra base bulb. (This is the skinny bulb base, not the normal one. Also known as the E12 base.) Now I have a bunch of places that use those bulbs, so this was interesting. So I bought one. It is a 2025LEDE12-30K-24 from Lights Of America. It cost $7.99 and is rated for 30,000 hours and uses 1.5 watts. In appearence it looks sorta of like the flame tip 40 watters it is replacing, but the bulb is a little fatter and it has a white blob of plastic above the screw in base that hides the electronics. The bulb part has about 10 LEDs in it.

I tried it in the chandelier first. The bulb is too ugly to stay there, but it seems to work ok. The package says not to put it in a dimmed circuit, but I tried it anyway. The bulb stayed at full output as the incandesents dimmed and then cut out completely. We hardly ever use the dimmer, so this is not that big a deal. The light seemed to be an ok white (much better than the flood) but more directional than I liked as all the LEDs point straight up. 

I next tried it in a fixture on the porch that looks sort of like a coach lantern and has two of the 40 watters in it. It looked fine there, but more of the light was aimed up than I really wanted. I decided to leave the bulb there and see how things go. It is outside, but well under the porch roof and it never gets direct water contact.

Bottom line. This is much more satisfactory than the canister flood style bulb. I might buy another one to put in another of the outdoor fixtures. I will probably end up with one LED and one normal bulb in each of the outside fixtures as that seems to give a good balance between light quality and saving energy.

13 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On October 08, 2009 at 11:09 AM, jddubya (45.77) wrote:

Good post!  I do recall your previous blogs about the led bulbs... this blog is just the reminder I needed to go check them out...

Report this comment
#2) On October 08, 2009 at 11:12 AM, VOLCANOPUKER (98.46) wrote:

So which stocks would this observation translate too?  I also have noticed the improvement in LED's beyond stoplights and traffic signals, but have never been able to dig deep enough to find a company to seriously consider investing in based on a growth in production growth / in profit sort of thesis.

Report this comment
#3) On October 08, 2009 at 2:02 PM, rofgile (99.31) wrote:

Volcanopuker:  CREE is the major one..

Report this comment
#4) On October 08, 2009 at 3:17 PM, devoish (98.54) wrote:

VCPuker, cree, siemens, phillips

Report this comment
#5) On October 09, 2009 at 12:20 PM, gofrogsatx (< 20) wrote:

Here's another LED manufacturer on the rise:

Seesmart LED - they have the deepest product line. I've had very good success with their bulbs.  UL/ETL listed.

Report this comment
#6) On October 13, 2009 at 4:37 PM, BravoBevo (99.97) wrote:

chk999:  Your description of your front porch light sounds like my front porch.  I just had an idea. You say the light emitted from the LED bulb in your coach lantern fixture points straight up (probably into the botom of the lantern's lid).  Would there be more light generally if you were to put a mirror or other reflective item on the bottom of that lid?  It seems that the light would then bounce around and make for a brighter front porch.

BTW, congratulations on earning the Top Fool position. 

Report this comment
#7) On October 13, 2009 at 5:32 PM, kdakota630 (29.59) wrote:

Congrats as well, although I missed it happen and had no idea until just now.

Report this comment
#8) On October 13, 2009 at 9:43 PM, portefeuille (99.51) wrote:

I have written a post on Aixtron (AIXG) and "LED stocks" here. Also have a look at this earlier post on LED by chk999.

Report this comment
#9) On October 13, 2009 at 10:40 PM, Eudemonic (66.99) wrote:

Thanks to a cool website www.wolframalpha.com, I entered 30000 hours to learn that the LED bulb you described is rated to last for 3.425 year or 1250 days.

 Entering $7.99/1250 days yields $0.0003692/day depreciation for the bulb..

If my current rate for electricity is $0.14/kilowatthour

1. 1.5 watts = 0.0015Kilowatts.

2. 0.0015Killowatts * $0.14/killowatthour = $0.0021/hour for light from an LED. 

That's sound like a lotta light for next to nothing.

 

 

 

 

 

Report this comment
#10) On October 13, 2009 at 10:46 PM, portefeuille (99.51) wrote:

a post on wolframalpha.com.

Report this comment
#11) On October 13, 2009 at 10:53 PM, portefeuille (99.51) wrote:

#2,3,4,5 It might be a good idea to buy a "basket of LED stocks". These are the ones I mention in my post (they all to some extent "have to do with LED" ...).

AIXG - AIXTRON
VECO - Veeco Instruments
CREE - Cree
011070.KS - LG Innotek
009150.KS - Samsung Electro-Mechanics
001210.KS - Kumho Electric

Report this comment
#12) On October 14, 2009 at 12:23 AM, NOTvuffett (< 20) wrote:

chk, you said in your old article the light was too blue and too directional for the first LED lamp you bought.  Couldn't they fix that by putting in some other color LED's, a diffuser and maybe even a cheap plastic lense? 

Report this comment
#13) On October 14, 2009 at 12:26 AM, NOTvuffett (< 20) wrote:

chk, you said in your old article the light was too blue and too directional for the first LED lamp you bought.  Couldn't they fix that by putting in some other color LED's, a diffuser and maybe even a cheap plastic lense? 

Report this comment

Featured Broker Partners


Advertisement