Use access key #2 to skip to page content.

Boneheads and Windows Phone 7

Recs

27

November 15, 2010 – Comments (14) | RELATED TICKERS: MSFT , GOOGL , AAPL

If I read one more idiotic article about the failure of Windows Phone 7, I'm going to have to get my gun.

Raise your hand if you use copy and paste on your phone. Yeah, I thought so. My last windows phone (an older samsung) HAD copy and paste and I can count the number of times I used it on one hand. I had the phone 5 years and used it for a ton of business.

As for the whining about no "multitasking," this is 95% rubbish from morons who've never used the phone and 5% rubbish from people who don't know enough to know what they're complaining about.

Let's clear up the FUD: Windows Phone 7 devices can absolutely do more than one thing at a time. It's just that the standard for most aps is that they turn off when you switch. That's a GOOD thing. Phones have limited battery life (and limited memory) and you don't need aps you're not using to be chewing up either of those. Since the phones have high minimum hardware specs, aps start up in a second or two, which is, I suspect, the real desire of those who claim to want "multitasking." Trust me, your fart ap will open quickly enough.

Here's how the terrible "lack of multi-tasking" shackles us poor windows phone 7 users... I can listen to music while I'm doing other things with the phone: play games, browse the web, whatever. GPS-based apps can follow you while you run music and send a text. That's as much mutitasking as most people need.

Moreover, many aps function just fine with the lock screen up, like GPS aps, working as intended. I don't know what the nerdlingers out there in self-important reviwerland think they're going to do with "multitasking," but it certainly isn't multitask.

As for the lack of cut and paste. Fine. copy/cut and paste is pretty much unecessary because the phone does an amazing job making anything you'd want to copy and paste (like a phone number, web address, or physical address) a working link. You don't need to copy and paste an address if you can click it to get a map. You don't need to copy a phone number if one click gets you to dialing it.

Need copy and paste in Word and Excel on the phone? I doubt it. It's nice to have those aps there, but they're for verification and touchup, not composition. 99% of users will never notice the difference, and the 1% who will will get their cut and paste in a couple months.

In the mean time, the reviewers are completely whiffing on the major paradigm shift that the phone gets right -- effortlessly combining a variety of online services into the correct "themes" or hubs, like the way it shuffled my outlook contacts (moved to hotmail) with my facebook contacts, and the way it integrates facebook pictures with skydrive pictures, phone pictures and others under the pictures hub.

The apps store and Zune software makes iTunes look like a web site designed for a church quilting group, and it's already populated with scores of very good, very useful apps. The Xbox 360 integration is tight, fun, and will be very sticky for people who like to game.

Everyone I've showed the phone to has done nothing but go bug-eyed in awe. My wife's students are all jonesing to get one and ditch their current phones. Maybe, just maybe, people no longer think a screen of dead chicklets is the epitome of phone OS design? (I thought that back when Apple ripped off the design from the Palm pilot, but hey...)

More legitimate beefs include hardware that's not as slick as Apple's and the lack of tetherability, although again, that's something that will only matter to very few. Those who actually need tethering plans get the doodad for their laptop, and anyone who's ever tethered to a 3G network (me... a lot...) knows that it's only slightly better than not being online at all.

Lack of front camera is a bit of a drag, but that will likely be addressed within months by hardware makers and a software update, or aps.

Do yourself a favor. Stop reading reviews by pinheads more interested in scoring points against Microsoft (hatin' on Microsoft? How very daring!) by rehashing nonsense that the other twerp wrote last week.

Head  to the local AT&T store to check out a Samsung Focus. Or come by my desk and I'll show you. This is a great phone OS, it's going to get better, and it's nice to have something other than iPhone and iPhoneClone (Android).

14 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On November 16, 2010 at 1:44 AM, borisvolodnikov (72.75) wrote:

This phone OS has a lot going for it. The developer community is very amped about the opportunity that it presents, and the demand for development hardware was pretty intense before release (it was very hard to get hardware to test on, and it was for very strict short time periods when you got it).

I guess as a point of disclosure I should mention that I'm a software developer specializing in the Microsoft stack at a consulting firm, though I don't develop software for Windows Phone 7 professionally (I do dabble for fun!).

 I've always taken the position that the platform isn't nearly as important as the applications that run on it. One thing Microsoft does really well is providing first-class technologies and tooling that make software development a breeze. Developers are very excited to avoid the draconian restrictions of Apple, and the drawer-from-hell containing every piece of hardware you need to test your app on for Android.

 I guess what I'm getting at is that we're going to see some very exciting third-party apps in the near future, and those apps are bound to give the platform some traction.

Report this comment
#2) On November 16, 2010 at 7:40 AM, TMFBent (99.81) wrote:

I forgot the one thing that IS a big screwup for MSFT on WP&: No tasks list.

Not that you can't get a todo app. There are several good ones already. A free one (miTodo) is the best I have tried.

But I want my tasks from outlook or, since it's all in the cloud now, my tasks from hotmail (or Google, if that's your bag.). This is something I had, no problem, on my 5 year-old windows phone.

Trouble is, WP doesn't sync at all with outlook anymore. (You read that right. An iPhone will sync with outlook. With WP7, you need to move all your local computer stuff from outlook to the cloud. Luckily, that takes 5 minutes with hotmail's tight outlook integration. And although I thought I'd hate that, I now prefer it. The leap forward is great. Calendar and contact changes made from anywhere automatically propogate to everywhere else, no plugging in cords. That's a nice step ahead of the iPhone and just about everyone else.

EXCEPT: The exchange server system they put hotmail on doesn't sync tasks from online (not even with desktop outlook 2010) and no task system works with the phone's calendar app or front tile.

There have been a lot of discussions about this, and I would not be surprised to see MSFT rectify it in some way, as its core phone customers seem to be task users. If not, the lack of desktop-integrated tasks is at least no worse than on iPhone and Android, which also doesn't bother with them.

Report this comment
#3) On November 16, 2010 at 10:23 AM, Gemini846 (50.29) wrote:

Wait wait, you are promoting a Windows Phone?

I had an old Samsung too. I use a Droid phone now.

Old and Busted <--- || ---> New Hotness

Any questions?

Droid does copy/paste, does save running aps w/out using ram, does run optimal battery configurations, does have security, does not have potential virus issues not related to stupid users.

Frankly Droid does and MS does not.

If they can't get windows to run on tiny computers with a lot more processing power than a phone, then frankly I'm not convinced it is going to work in the long haul.

It would be like me wanting to go run out and buy a Chevy after 40 years of producing crap. Quit shining the Turd.

I am not some google fanboi. I think their hegemony is pretty disgusting and own 0 shares of thier stock. I use IE8 and Win7 at home, but honestly the purity that is Droid (w/out all the warez from providers) makes me seriously interested in switching.

Report this comment
#4) On November 16, 2010 at 11:02 AM, djemonk (< 20) wrote:

Or come by my desk and I'll show you.

I'll be right over.  How do I get there from midtown manhattan?

I'm glad to see this review.  I'm not a heavy smartphone user although I've had one for a few years, so I'm interested to see what other busines users are thinking about Windows Mobile 7.

Thanks for this blog post!

Report this comment
#5) On November 16, 2010 at 11:11 AM, TMFBent (99.81) wrote:

Droid's not pure, and it's the new Windows Mobile. By letting hardware makers do whatever they want, ditto ap writers, and phone companies, it's impossible to get a consistent look and feel. I nearly went down the droid road, until I realized I'd have to figure out annoyances like "do I like the Motorola skin? HTC's 'Sense?'"

 

Report this comment
#6) On November 16, 2010 at 11:27 AM, Turfscape (41.86) wrote:

I completely agree that technology reviewers don't live in the real world. Forr whatever reason, technology reviewers seem to have the expectation that every piece of technology should do everything all the time for everyone: "Sure the display is nice, but iPhone 4 does a horrible job of washing dishes. We'll wait for the next interation of RIM's Blackberry Incredulous from Whirlpool, which will feature a scrub and soak, along with integrated multi-tasking, and 6 cameras, slide-out keyboard and desk chair, with real-time intergalactic image transport functions"

It seems that WP7 works well for you. To me, that's the only measure one needs.

Personally, I'm an Apple fan. I like the interface, and I've been on the "iPlatform" for a while, so everything I have is integrated. So, when techies and feature junkies step up to point out all the things that iPhone can't do...I give a little shrug and say, "huh, it works pretty well for me".

Report this comment
#7) On November 16, 2010 at 12:36 PM, miteycasey (30.59) wrote:

raises hand!! I use copy/paste daily.

You mention things the phone doesn't have...why is that? Like most Microsoft products they are late to market 3-4 years behind the product that their competitors make. Why would I by a car without A/C, power breaks, and air bags when the one sitting right next to it has those features?

I think phones are like tools. Get the tool that fills the job at hand. I've had a Windows 5 and windows 6 phone and wouldn't touch another windows phone after I've used an iphone becuase I use it more as a multimedia device than an email/calendar/Office extention device. 

 

Report this comment
#8) On November 16, 2010 at 12:39 PM, djemonk (< 20) wrote:

 So, when techies and feature junkies step up to point out all the things that iPhone can't do...I give a little shrug and say, "huh, it works pretty well for me".

Apple has always been good at this.  But just wait until you decide you want some of your data on an alternate, non-Apple device.  Then you'll see what the techies are really trying to tell you.

Don't get me wrong, Apple products are generally beautiful and better designed than anything else coming out of the US market (although the performance has left something to be desired since the 80s), but once you're in, it's not always easy to get out.  And outside the "walled garden", stuff is much, much cheaper.

Report this comment
#9) On November 16, 2010 at 12:41 PM, TMFBent (99.81) wrote:

You mention things the phone doesn't have...why is that? Like most Microsoft products they are late to market 3-4 years behind the product that their competitors make.

Wrong. They had copy and paste before Apple had a phone. They took it out of WP7 because 99.9% of people never use it and don't need it.

I've used an iphone becuase I use it more as a multimedia device than an email/calendar/Office extention device

Exactly the point of the new Phone OS, which is nothing like the old one, and superior as a mutimedia device to the iPhone. Best of all, you never have to use iTunes again.

Report this comment
#10) On November 16, 2010 at 12:45 PM, djemonk (< 20) wrote:

and wouldn't touch another windows phone after I've used an iphone becuase I use it more as a multimedia device than an email/calendar/Office extention device. 

That's the thing.  You're not the target audience for a Windows Mobile phone.  Microsoft is basically going after the Blackberry customers, not the iPhone customers.  MS knows they can't compete with Apple on Apple's terms.  They've tried many times over decades and have almost always lost.

Microsoft is about productivity, business productivity in particular.  They've been figuring that out and, except for the XBox, they've stayed in that niche and are doing well.  Guys who love their phone and want to use it all the time are not guys that Microsoft is trying to get as customers.  They're after the segment of people who, like you said, view their phone usage as a means to an end and not an end in and of itself. 

Report this comment
#11) On November 16, 2010 at 1:07 PM, MegaEurope (< 20) wrote:

I nearly went down the droid road, until I realized I'd have to figure out annoyances like "do I like the Motorola skin? HTC's 'Sense?'"

The UI is already loaded when you buy a phone.  If you want to leave your phone settings as is, nobody is holding a gun to your head.

Report this comment
#12) On November 16, 2010 at 2:29 PM, miteycasey (30.59) wrote:

You mention things the phone doesn't have...why is that? Like most Microsoft products they are late to market 3-4 years behind the product that their competitors make.

Wrong. They had copy and paste before Apple had a phone. They took it out of WP7 because 99.9% of people never use it and don't need it.

"People don't use it so we won't include it" seriously? that's your argument?  Leaving out something as basic as c/p is like is foolish. That's like leaving out a drink coaster in a car because not everyone has a cup of coffee with them when they drive.

It's just not copy and paste.

1) two cameras

2) device wide search

3) multitasking

Nevermind the lagging in the App market. 

This is a market Microsoft has been left behind, but can't admit it.

But enjoy your phone. 

Report this comment
#13) On November 17, 2010 at 5:37 PM, borisvolodnikov (72.75) wrote:

That's the thing.  You're not the target audience for a Windows Mobile phone.  Microsoft is basically going after the Blackberry customers, not the iPhone customers. 

You couldn't be more wrong. Sitting in the developer community, there is a tremendous amount of groaning from devs because there's no way to deploy apps to the phone aside from the Marketplace. This means that if you have a custom application written for your enterprise (and noone else) there is no way to deploy it to just your users without listing it to the whole public.

Microsoft is still keeping Windows Mobile 6.5 around for this exact reason. WM 6.5 is for the enterprise; WP7 is the bid for the consumer market.

Report this comment
#14) On November 17, 2010 at 6:27 PM, FreeMortal (29.33) wrote:

Phones can be correlated to wardrobe:

iPhone users wear trendy clothes every day

BlackBerry users wear suits every day

Droid users wear shirts that say something like "Code Monkey"

Windows Mobile users wear a 20 year old shirt with faded letters "Where do you want to go today?"
 

Every once in a while, Microsoft makes a solid knock-off of someone else's idea.  Sometimes it actually is better. The latest Windows mobile could be it, but I'm pretty doubtful.  I use copy/paste all the time.

I'll just have to wait for one of my geeky friends to get one.  If its any good, he'll be dying to show it off.  

Report this comment

Featured Broker Partners


Advertisement