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BP oil recovery

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June 06, 2010 – Comments (6)

I am glad to see they are finally having some success at reducing this disaster.  Interesting they recovered 10,500 barrels in one day, yet they maintained for weeks upon weeks that the amount of oil leaking was half that...  I have a friend who works in oil and gas and he said they wouldn't even drill for 5000 barrels per day, more they'd be going for about 50,000 barrels per day.  It would be way to expensive to drill for only 5000 barrels per day.

I have not seen anything about how many barrels per day they expected to get out of the well once it was finished being built.

 

6 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On June 06, 2010 at 7:40 PM, davejh23 (< 20) wrote:

Most expert commentary I've seen has suggested that the leak has probably been between 20K and 70K barrels per day.  If the leak is closer to the high end of that range (close to 200 million gallons leaked to date), then 10.5K barrels recovered a day is still a disaster.  They're still pumping dispersants into the gulf that many argue are far more dangerous that the oil.  Hopefully they continue to improve on their current efforts over the next several months (until the relief well is complete) and not just declare this a success.

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#2) On June 06, 2010 at 8:52 PM, russiangambit (29.12) wrote:

>  I have a friend who works in oil and gas and he said they wouldn't even drill for 5000 barrels per day, more they'd be going for about 50,000 barrels per day. 

But they were going to seal the well and move the platform. They never stated the reason but may be it wasn't rich enough?

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#3) On June 06, 2010 at 8:56 PM, russiangambit (29.12) wrote:

To add - I wasn't looking for this information but I find it strange that BP didn't release much of what they know about the well: how much reserves are underneath, how much they were pimping before the accident, what the pressure was, how wide the pipe was, what is thre mix of oil vs. gas vs. water. Nothing really that would llow to calculate the flow and the worst case scenario.

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#4) On June 06, 2010 at 9:46 PM, dwot (53.13) wrote:

russiangambit, the underwater pressure isn't that hard to estimate if you know the depth, they keep saying a mile, so 5280 ft and you get one more atmosphere of pressure every 30 ft, so 175 atmospheres or about 2600 psi.

Interesting what you find when you do a search.  This article talks about a well designed to extract 200,000 barrels per day.  Some of the depths they talk about are much deeper then a mile.

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#5) On June 07, 2010 at 7:20 AM, OneLegged (< 20) wrote:

Yes, BP seems to have maintained that the leak was only 1000 barrels per day (I believe that is 42,000 gallons), but yet two days ago they claimed they had "captured over 400,000 barrels in a 24 hour period.  They have been lying since day one. 

There seems that there was zero plan and no technology available to deal with this situation.  They are grasping at straws and trying to invent methods after the fact.

 I will also be extremely surprised if the taxpayers don't end up on the hook for a good portion of the clean up.  This is, after all, is an era of "privatize the profits and socialize the losses "

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#6) On June 08, 2010 at 10:54 AM, imobillc (< 20) wrote:

As expected, just a great post by dwot

+1 REC

Big Oil’s Chernobyl 

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/environment/big-oils-chernobyl/1298/

 

 

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