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August 24, 2009 – Comments (22)

Quite a few "caps" game players appear to be rather "confident" the STEC rally will continue. Very limited "profit taking".

22 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On August 24, 2009 at 7:45 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:


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#2) On August 24, 2009 at 7:48 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:



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#3) On August 24, 2009 at 7:56 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

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August 24, 2009, 3:37 pm

STEC Rallies On Bullish Sentiment On Solid-State Drives

Posted by Eric Savitz

It’s a big day for shares of STEC (STEC), a specialist in flash memory-based solid-state drives, which are gradually gaining acceptance for both laptop and enterprise applications.

While I see no specific drivers for the stock’s rise, there are a couple of tidbits that hint at an impoving environment for solid-state drives.

SSDs remain much more expensive than conventional hard drives, but as flash memory prices erode, the gap is narrowing. CNET notes today that Microsoft Windows 7 will include new technology that will allow blocks of data to be freed up for reuse to better maintain the performance of SSDs. Meanwhile, a Computerworld story picked up by the San Francisco Chronicle yesterday asserts that cloud computing could be a boon for flash-based storage.

STEC today is up $2.98, or 8.5%, to $37.95.

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#4) On August 24, 2009 at 7:59 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

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The cloud could be a boon for flash storage
Web-based companies are hoping to use the technology to speed user access to hosted data.
Stephen Lawson
 
August 24, 2009 12:01 AM ET

Computerworld - Cloud computing and flash-based storage, two fast-emerging IT technologies, are driving each other forward as users of Internet-based services like social networks demand near-real-time access to ever-growing amounts of data.
Executives at Web-based companies like MySpace Inc. and Facebook Inc. are calling flash storage technologies vital to the future of businesses like theirs, which must deliver data to thousands of users simultaneously.
"In the last 20 years, spinning disk really hasn't gone any faster, and right now we're really on the cusp of a change with flash technologies," said Richard Buckingham, MySpace's vice president of technical operations, speaking at The GigaOM Network's Structure 09 conference in San Francisco earlier this summer.
At the same conference, Jonathan Heiliger, vice president of technical operations at Facebook, predicted that "flash is going to have a very, very significant effect on not just storage, but infrastructure as a whole. I think it's going to have at least as significant an impact as going from single-core to multicore CPUs."
Flash storage is faster than hard disk drives because it doesn't need to spin a disk to get to a particular bit of data. With flash technologies like solid-state disk drives (SSD) and PCI Express flash cards, it's possible to read data anywhere in a storage device in less than a millisecond, compared with several milliseconds on a traditional hard disk drive. SSD and flash storage systems also take up less space and use less power than spinning disks.
The data centers of cloud-based companies are so big that all of those benefits really matter, said Andrew Reichman, an analyst at Forrester Research Inc.
Although corporate IT shops could also take advantage of the performance gains, the high cost of flash technology will likely continue to blunt its progress in enterprise IT, according to analysts. IDC estimates that SSD storage costs as much as 25 times more than spinning disks on a per-gigabyte basis, said Jeff Janukowicz, an analyst at the Framingham, Mass.-based IT research firm.
Triple-digit growth
Nonetheless, the growing needs of large-scale Web-based companies for better performance, improved capacity utilization and lower power consumption will help drive up enterprise SSD sales by an average of 165% annually until 2013, IDC predicts. Gartner Inc. also expects a surge in flash use, projecting 2009 sales of 281,000 SSDs, up from 59,000 last year.
In addition to fast access to data stored in the cloud, Facebook anticipates that flash storage can provide "tremendous" gains in reliability while using significantly less power than other storage systems, Heiliger said.
MySpace expects that flash storage could save space in data centers while still supporting the fast page loads that users demand, according to Buckingham. By replacing disk drives with flash technology, MySpace can use 1U servers instead of taller 2U models, which would save a lot of space in a company whose data centers collectively occupy 60,000 square feet.
MySpace also hopes to one day use flash technology to cache frequently used data and to maintain indexes for searches, Buckingham said.
However, the social networking company won't rely on flash for persistent data, such as the pictures users post on their pages. Only about one-twentieth of the company's data would ever be stored on flash. "I'm never going to write something to an SSD and hope it lasts forever," Buckingham said.
MySpace is working with flash vendors to establish baselines for performance and reliability, he added.
Hoping to take advantage of the growing demand, several top storage vendors have unveiled flash technologies in the past year. Many of the offerings are based on products developed by Stec Inc. in Santa Ana, Calif.
EMC Corp. added SSD technology to several of its storage offerings, while IBM executives have said that flash should be available for all of the company's enterprise storage platforms by the end of this year. Meanwhile, Hewlett-Packard Co. offers SSD technology for its high-end XP storage arrays and midrange Enterprise Virtual Arrays, as well as flash cards made by Fusion-io Inc. that fit into HP servers.
Lawson is a reporter for the IDG News Service.
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#5) On August 24, 2009 at 8:01 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

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August 24, 2009 9:00 AM PDT

Intel, Microsoft event to highlight Windows 7 improvements

by Brooke Crothers

Intel and Microsoft will hold an event next week to discuss collaboration on improvements to Windows 7.

The event, on September 1 in San Francisco, will "share how the two companies collaborated on key enhancements during the development of Windows 7," according to Intel. Steve Smith, vice president and director, Intel's Digital Enterprise Group Operations, and Michael Angiulo, general manager of Windows Planning and PC Ecosystem at Microsoft, will talk at the event. Microsoft plans to launch Windows 7 on October 22.
Windows 7 collaboration will be demonstrated by engineers from both companies, according to Intel. Not surprisingly, Microsoft is working closely with Intel, whose chips will power the vast majority of PCs running Windows 7.
In a blog posted in July, Intel described how Microsoft and Intel "saw unique opportunities to optimize Windows 7 for Intel processor technology" in the areas of performance, power management, and graphics.
The blog discusses improvements to multitasking based on "SMT Parking," which provides additional support to the Windows 7 scheduler for Intel Hyper-threading Technology. With Hyper-threading, the operating system sees a single processor core as two cores (i.e., a dual-core chip becomes a virtual quad-core processor), thus potentially improving multitasking--or doing tasks (threads) simultaneously.
In addition, improvements over Vista for boot and shutdown times have been implemented during the Windows 7 development cycle, according to the blog.
And on Intel's Web site, the chipmaker lists desktop motherboards and associated drivers that have passed logo certification for Windows 7.
Another beneficiary of improved Windows 7 technology: Intel solid-state drives, which are typically faster than hard-disk drives and gaining ground in niche markets such as high-end laptops, gaming PCs, and servers. SSDs will be able to take advantage of Windows 7 technology called the Trim Command. Trim will allow blocks of data to be freed up for reuse to better maintain the performance of the SSD.
Windows 7 will also do more than previous operating systems with graphics via DirectX 11. Advanced Micro Devices has described DirectX 11-related technology that enables games developers to create smoother, less blocky and more organic looking objects in games. And, beyond games, Windows 7 has the potential to turn a graphics processing unit (GPU) from AMD or Nvidia into a general-purpose compute engine, used to accelerate everyday computing tasks like a central processing unit, or CPU. Specifically, "the compute shader" can be used to speed up more common computing tasks. The buzz word used to describe this technology is a mouthful: GPGPU or general-purpose graphics processing unit.

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#6) On August 24, 2009 at 8:03 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

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#176) On March 13, 2009 at 1:00 PM, portefeuille (99.98) wrote: STEC - 7.60 - outperform

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(from here)

 

 

 

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#7) On August 24, 2009 at 8:22 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:



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#8) On August 24, 2009 at 9:30 PM, awallejr (82.72) wrote:

Whoever bought stec at $5 in real life and still holding must be happy.

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#9) On August 24, 2009 at 9:42 PM, ChrisGraley (30.25) wrote:

Another push for SSD's will come from consumer demand for Netbooks, (Mainly due to heat, durability and battery performance.) but I'm wary on investing in STEC at this point myself.

Although I'm fully expecting SSD's to get a bigger piece of the pie in the up coming years, I expect the size of that pie to be a whole lot smaller until the economy recovers. IT spending and consumer spending may not hit 2007 levels again until 2011 or 2012. That is an eternity in the IT industry and gives enough time for a competing technology to get a foothold.

The new technology would be something like this.

 

However, if you believe in a quick recovery,  STEC is a good bet.

Your chasing a bit, since it's had a nice run since January, but there's room to run if you're confident in this market.

 

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#10) On August 24, 2009 at 9:44 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

... or at $1.03 on 09/26/01.

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#11) On August 24, 2009 at 9:58 PM, ChrisGraley (30.25) wrote:

:) nice buy!

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#12) On August 24, 2009 at 10:07 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

Yes, but I was not among those buying on 09/26/01. The "HRD" thing looks interesting.

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#13) On August 24, 2009 at 11:18 PM, ChrisGraley (30.25) wrote:

IBM is working on something too, but I couldn't find a link.

Believe it or not it goes back to using punched paper like the first computers did.

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#14) On August 25, 2009 at 12:49 AM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

from good old Feuerstein

Biotech Stock Mailbag: Geron, Oculus, BioSante

Biotech Mailbag: Biocryst, Anadys, Allos, Amag

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#15) On August 25, 2009 at 10:44 AM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

the first greater that 1000 score points calls?

 



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#16) On August 25, 2009 at 12:56 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

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Glaxo eyes up Human Genome Sciences

Bid talk was back in vogue as the blue-chip index rose for a fifth day in a row to close within a whisker of the 4900 mark.

Ben Harrington

Published: 9:45PM BST 24 Aug 2009

Indeed, with the FTSE 100 putting on almost 1pc and several companies announcing they had received takeover approaches, dealers were quick to air more bullish bid tales.

Monday's fresh gossip was that GlaxoSmithKline is preparing a $30-a-share offer for US-based Human Genome Sciences. Glaxo slipped 15½p to £12.02 and Nasdaq-listed Human Genome Sciences was up about 64 cents at $17.00 by the time the London market closed.

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#145) On March 10, 2009 at 3:06 PM, portefeuille (99.98) wrote: HGSI - 0.50 - outperform

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#595) On July 16, 2009 at 1:00 PM, portefeuille (99.98) wrote: HGSI - end outperform - 3.69 - no new rating

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(from here)

 

HGSI is currently at ca. $19.76.

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#17) On August 25, 2009 at 2:11 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:



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#18) On August 25, 2009 at 2:17 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

... so some improvement since July.

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#19) On August 25, 2009 at 4:12 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

New Sigma Advanced Genetic Engineering Labs Offers Research Community Unique Rodent Models Developed Using Exclusive Gene-Editing Technology

Sangamo rises further on Sigma-Aldrich study plan

 

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#314) On March 25, 2009 at 9:53 AM, portefeuille (99.98) wrote: SGMO - 4.42 - outperform

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#748) On August 25, 2009 at 4:01 PM, portefeuille (99.98) wrote: SGMO - end outperform - 7.21 - new rating: market perform

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#20) On August 25, 2009 at 5:19 PM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

Canadian stocks surge as BMO's quarterly profit climbs

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#21) On August 26, 2009 at 9:49 AM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

 

 

(from here)

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#22) On August 26, 2009 at 10:02 AM, portefeuille (99.56) wrote:

 

 

#145) On March 10, 2009 at 3:06 PM, portefeuille (99.98) wrote: HGSI - 0.50 - outperform

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