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Forget art history and calculus. Most students need to learn how to run a business, says Scott Adams.-WSJ

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April 15, 2011 – Comments (12)

Forget art history and calculus. Most students need to learn how to run a business, says Scott Adams.-WSJ

 

The best way to encompass a truth is with humor.

12 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On April 15, 2011 at 8:22 PM, mtf00l (44.92) wrote:

That's awesome!

Have you never heard "A" students teach and "B" students work for "C" students?

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#2) On April 16, 2011 at 2:45 PM, Betapeg (< 20) wrote:

Nice article. Reminds me of my obligation to take General Chemistry I and II (still haven't taken II), even though I'm a finance major concentrating in financial analysis. How the hell is chemistry going to help me??? Total waste of my time and money. 

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#3) On April 16, 2011 at 3:10 PM, AvianFlu (41.53) wrote:

Beta:
The idea of a liberal arts education is to help you learn how to learn. Also, becoming "well-rounded" is a goal. Often, seemingly inappropriate classes will get you to think in ways unfamiliar to you and will often pay dividends in surprising ways. A four year liberal arts education should not be looked on as vocational training. It is not intended to help you quality for a job. For that, you are best going to a community college.

I have two degrees. One is in computer technology with a minor in mathematics and a minor in physics. I also have a music degree. Although I was a college level mathematics teacher for years I'll have to say that neither degree was particularly useful from a vocational standpoint. I have been lucky enough to be very successful in business and also in investing. I think that was perhaps the result of various college classes I took, although they were seemingly unrelated. Probably the most useful class for me was informal logic. After taking that you'll find yourself barely able to listen to a political speech.

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#4) On April 17, 2011 at 2:54 PM, Betapeg (< 20) wrote:

Well-roundedness and everything sounds nice and everything, but I seriously doubt it's about that. Frankly, I think it's all about money. The more classes you take, the more the school makes. Add to that, parking permits, tickets, and zero help with tuition, and I find the notion that they're trying to make me well-rounded, as laughable. 

But hey, you're right. In the end, it does expose me to things outside my specialty. But if I think about the fact that I'm paying for a service, I want something that is logical and pertinent to my interests (really, my major) and not just a money pit. 

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#5) On April 18, 2011 at 12:57 PM, mtf00l (44.92) wrote:

You see, you've already learned something outside your field! =D

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#6) On April 18, 2011 at 1:08 PM, Turfscape (44.61) wrote:

Betapeg wrote:
"even though I'm a finance major concentrating in financial analysis. How the hell is chemistry going to help me??? Total waste of my time and money."

Don't the major chemical manufacturers need financial analysis, too?

Also, wouldn't knowing something about the products that are produced by, oh say...BASF, come in handy if you were looking to prepare an analysis of their revenue for investment sake.

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#7) On April 20, 2011 at 2:44 PM, Betapeg (< 20) wrote:

There is no way my chemistry 101 class is going to give me some awesome insight in some obscure chemical made by a company, not even mentioning how such an insight would aid an investment decision. On this logic, I should also become a computer programmer so I can be able to analyze Microsoft versus Apple. All I'm saying is, when I choose a specialty, I shouldn't have to take things that have absolutely nothing to do with it, because my time, money, and brain power are limited to that which is most important as a matter of productivity and practicality.

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#8) On April 21, 2011 at 9:29 AM, Turfscape (44.61) wrote:

Betapeg wrote:
"All I'm saying is, when I choose a specialty, I shouldn't have to take things that have absolutely nothing to do with it, because my time, money, and brain power are limited to that which is most important as a matter of productivity and practicality."

Please don't take this as demeaning...but it sounds like what you're looking for is an Associate's Degree, not a Bachelor's Degree.

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#9) On April 21, 2011 at 1:06 PM, Betapeg (< 20) wrote:

Don't tell me you actually buy into the whole "well-rounded student" line?

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#10) On April 21, 2011 at 2:02 PM, Turfscape (44.61) wrote:

Betapeg wrote:
"Don't tell me you actually buy into the whole "well-rounded student" line?"

I'm not sure what you mean, exactly, by "buy into". I think different paths of education for different people and different careers makes thorough sense.

I think technical colleges that offer Associate's Degrees with a strict focus on a specific discipline make a LOT of sense. I think far too many people denigrate students attending or coming out of a two-year college. I've had outstanding success with hiring people with a two-year degree. They've been able to come in with an extensive amount of practical knowledge and have had a good work ethic. Now, I can't necessarily attribute that to the college...but it's enough evidence for me to believe that an Associate's Degree does not equate to less capability in a person that one with a Bachelor's degree.

Aside from that, yes...I buy into being a well-rounded person. And that does start with being a well-rounded learner.

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#11) On April 21, 2011 at 2:11 PM, DukeTG (< 20) wrote:

As an engineering student in college, my classmates and I were constantly incensed that we were forced to take classes in history and literature to be "well rounded", as they did nothing but get in the way of our chemistry and advanced calculus classes.

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#12) On April 21, 2011 at 9:11 PM, Betapeg (< 20) wrote:

The motive is there for the school. The more classes you take, the more money they make. Why wouldn't they want to cram 4 years of your life with a bunch of useless classes that get in the way of the important ones? 

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