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Here Come the Online Jackboots: FBI Shuts Down Online Poker

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April 15, 2011 – Comments (20)

And I highly doubt I'll ever see the money in my Full Tilt Poker account again.

The bigger point: if you make enough laws, you can arrest anybody. Anybody becomes a criminal, even those engaging in peaceful, voluntary exchange.  While the American government wages war around the world and our Federal Reserves sends billions to overseas bankers and trophy wives, the FBI is concerned that I might check-raise some Lithuanian kid with 37o.

Here is the story.

David in Qatar

20 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On April 15, 2011 at 8:05 PM, catoismymotor (29.69) wrote:

David! Good to see you. Where you been?

I wonder how many feds were given warning about what was going down before it went down. You know some of them had some money out there. I had a friend and two of his buddies get arrested by local peace officers because they were involved in a fairly highstakes poker game held at a private residence. So much fuss over the gangster government not getting a cut of the action. Fat Tony wears a badge.

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#2) On April 15, 2011 at 8:11 PM, whereaminow (< 20) wrote:

Hi cato!

I went on vacation for a couple weeks but I always hovering around, couldn't totally unplug from CAPS lol.

I'm not a high stakes player, but I wonder what happens to guys with tens of thousands and more in their accounts. The Feds will probably seize it on the grounds of tax evasion.

David in Qatar

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#3) On April 15, 2011 at 8:11 PM, catoismymotor (29.69) wrote:

To clarify: My friend was arrested at the residence while the gambling was going on.

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#4) On April 15, 2011 at 8:15 PM, mtf00l (45.69) wrote:

Remember, disavow all knowledge...

"That's not my account,...hey what's the board and water for?!" =D

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#5) On April 15, 2011 at 8:18 PM, whereaminow (< 20) wrote:

To clarify: My friend was arrested at the residence while the gambling was going on.

Is this going to end up in trial?

David in Qatar

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#6) On April 15, 2011 at 8:54 PM, OneLegged (< 20) wrote:

Don't disavow all knowledge.  Never.  Instead say absolutely nothing.  Nothing.

 

 

+1

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#7) On April 15, 2011 at 10:07 PM, catoismymotor (29.69) wrote:

#5 - It did not go to trial for the three of them. The charges were dropped. The host was the main target. He was accused of money laundering, drug trafficking something else I can't remember.

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#8) On April 15, 2011 at 10:11 PM, catoismymotor (29.69) wrote:

Oh, duh! Gambling charges was the one I couldn't recall. Dumb me. I need to head to bed. The poker game was the excuse they used to enter the house in order to gather evidence for the other charges.

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#9) On April 15, 2011 at 11:46 PM, motleyanimal (81.78) wrote:

More abuse of Patriot Act provisions by the FBI for activities that have nothing to do with terrorism.

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#10) On April 16, 2011 at 12:50 AM, tomlongrpv (76.33) wrote:

A lot of bad transactions are "peaceful voluntary exchanges."  If all such things are legalized law enforcement will be much easier and less expensive.  And there will be a lot of opportunities for the clever to make money by duping the not so clever.  Perhaps gaming and voluntary tax payments (lottos run by government) should be legal for the mentally competent, but exactly where and how do we draw the line?   If all "peaceful voluntary excchanges" should be legal then there is no protection against consumer fraud, insider trading, etc.  As for me I'll err on the side of a little paternalism since the "freedom" that libertarians (aka anarchists) are so fond of is typically the freedom of the fox in the chicken coop.

 

 

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#11) On April 16, 2011 at 12:56 AM, awallejr (83.83) wrote:

Umm we poo pooing money laundering and drug trafficking if true?

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#12) On April 16, 2011 at 1:10 AM, whereaminow (< 20) wrote:

I poo poo nothing except the nonsense I hear from government agents, known liars and immoral animals that should never be given the authority to judge another man's actions.

Money laundering and drug trafficking are crimes created by governments and participated in by governments, who launder money and traffic drugs all the time. For christ's sake, the CIA has a formal drug running operation and only knows how to launder money.

David in Qatar

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#13) On April 16, 2011 at 1:38 AM, ozzfan1317 (79.37) wrote:

And then david stopped blogging after his unfortunate *accident* the government had no part in ..lol

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#14) On April 16, 2011 at 9:52 AM, whereaminow (< 20) wrote:

LOL, how many watch lists do you think I'm on?

David in Qatar

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#15) On April 16, 2011 at 10:34 AM, buffalonate (94.10) wrote:

Who cares whether people gamble or not.  It is their money to gamble away if they choose.  What should be illegal is casinos giving loans so people can gamble.  That stuff ruins lives. 

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#16) On April 16, 2011 at 1:05 PM, RonChapmanJr (79.18) wrote:

If you are constantly check-raising with 37o you probably don't have much money in your account anyway.  :) 

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#17) On April 16, 2011 at 8:17 PM, ChrisGraley (29.69) wrote:

If you are constantly check-raising with 37o you probably don't have much money in your account anyway.  :) 

Or you're at a table full of wimps. 

 

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#18) On April 16, 2011 at 8:56 PM, whereaminow (< 20) wrote:

I feel like Buckner walking back into Shea.

David in Qatar

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#19) On April 17, 2011 at 2:46 PM, Valyooo (99.37) wrote:

one of my best friends played poker on FT for a living (he ran 8 tables at once, idk how he could pay attention to all of them). he pretty much ignored his college grades for this.  he is so fuct

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#20) On April 29, 2011 at 7:05 PM, rfaramir (29.29) wrote:

"If all "peaceful voluntary excchanges" should be legal then there is no protection against consumer fraud, insider trading, etc."

Fraud is equivalent to force and thus NOT peaceful. Consumers can morally initiate force against those who defraud them. No nanny state necessary.

Insider trading would interestingly be legal in a libertarian state with probably beneficial consequences. As would blackmail (payment to refrain from gossiping) but not extortion (threat of force). The literature is quite interesting. Go to mises.org and start searching!

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