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lquadland10 (< 20)

Just wondering about the timing.

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June 14, 2011 – Comments (1) | RELATED TICKERS: GS , JPM , C

Maybe we should do what the Nasa Community is being asked to do. Nasa FEMA and Eagle Horizon ( no Worries Mate they do this annually. )   Quote.Listen to Administrator Bolden’s thoughts on why it’s important that we “know our stuff” and “be prepared”.
Administrator, Charles F. Bolden, Jr. Video
We are the only Agency in the Federal Government that is responsible for safety and well being of not only people here on earth but off this planet. ect...... And I have concerns that ours right now is not as good as it ought to be.  Ect............ Think about the Natural Disasters that could occur in your area. Think about attacks that could happen like 9/11 from outside forces.

So just a little something something in the news. However I do believe that we should all fallow this with our families. I wonder why it has not made it to our CFR news? If it's good enough for the NASA family it is good enough for us. http://www.nasa.gov/centers/hq/emergency/personalPreparedness/index.html

maybe I should buy some camping supply stock. Colman comes to mind. Can you think of more stocks to look into? 

1 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On June 14, 2011 at 12:17 PM, lquadland10 (< 20) wrote:

Oh and just a little odd note.Did the earthquake change the atmosphere or did the Atmosphere cause the earthquake.I do like science.  Just wondering.  http://arxiv.org/abs/1105.2841

Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary results Dimitar Ouzounov, Sergey Pulinets, Alexey Romanov, Alexander Romanov, Konstantin Tsybulya, Dimitri Davidenko, Menas Kafatos, Patrick Taylor (Submitted on 13 May 2011) The recent M9 Tohoku Japan earthquake of March 11, 2011 was the largest recorded earthquake ever to hit this nation. We retrospectively analyzed the temporal and spatial variations of four different physical parameters - outgoing long wave radiation (OLR), GPS/TEC, Low-Earth orbit tomography and critical frequency foF2. These changes characterize the state of the atmosphere and ionosphere several days before the onset of this earthquake. Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data and an anomaly developed near the epicenter. The GPS/TEC data indicate an increase and variation in electron density reaching a maximum value on March 8. Starting on this day in the lower ionospheric there was also confirmed an abnormal TEC variation over the epicenter. From March 3-11 a large increase in electron concentration was recorded at all four Japanese ground based ionosondes, which return to normal after the main earthquake. We found a positive correlation between the atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies and the Tohoku earthquake. This study may lead to a better understanding of the response of the atmosphere /ionosphere to the Great Tohoku earthquake Comments: Preliminary results reported at EGU 2011 in Vienna, Austria Subjects: Geophysics (physics.geo-ph); Space Physics (physics.space-ph) Cite as: arXiv:1105.2841v1 [physics.geo-ph]

 

Technology Review
Published by MIT

Geologists have long puzzled over anecdotal reports of strange atmospheric phenomena in the days before big earthquakes. But good data to back up these stories has been hard to come by.

In recent years, however, various teams have set up atmospheric monitoring stations in earthquake zones and a number of satellites are capable of sending back data about the state of the upper atmosphere and the ionosphere during an earthquake.

Last year, we looked at some fascinating data from the DEMETER spacecraft showing a significant increase in ultra-low frequency radio signals before the magnitude 7 Haiti earthquake in January 2010.

Today, Dimitar Ouzounov at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre in Maryland and a few buddies present the data from the Great Tohoku earthquake which devastated Japan on 11 March. Their results, although preliminary, are eye-opening.

They say that before the M9 earthquake, the total electron content of the ionosphere increased dramatically over the epicenter, reaching a maximum three days before the quake struck.

At the same time, satellite observations showed a big increase in infrared emissions from above the epicenter, which peaked in the hours before the quake. In other words, the atmosphere was heating up.

These kinds of observations are consistent with an idea called the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling mechanism. The thinking is that in the days before an earthquake, the great stresses in a fault as it is about to give cause the releases large amounts of radon.

The radioactivity from this gas ionises the air on a large scale and this has a number of knock on effects. Since water molecules are attracted to ions in the air, ionisation triggers the large scale condensation of water.

But the process of condensation also releases heat and it is this that causes infrared emissions. “Our first results show that on March 8th a rapid increase of emitted infrared radiation was observed from the satellite data,” say Ouzounov and co.

These emissions go on to effect the ionosphere and its total electron content.

It certainly makes sense that the lithosphere, atmosphere and ionosphere are coupled in a way that can be measured when one of them is perturbed. The question is to what extent the new evidence backs up this idea.

The Japan earthquake is the largest to have struck the island in modern times and will certainly turn out to be among the best studied. If good evidence of this relationship doesn’t emerge from this data, other opportunities will be few and far between.

Ref: arxiv.org/abs/1105.2841: Atmosphere-Ionosphere Response to the M9 Tohoku Earthquake Revealed by Joined Satellite and Ground Observations. Preliminary Results.

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