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lquadland10 (< 20)

Knowledge is not good or bad.

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August 28, 2011 – Comments (4) | RELATED TICKERS: GS , C , JPM

It just depends on how you use it.

4 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On August 28, 2011 at 5:51 PM, RetroAlum (< 20) wrote:

Cheers for the title, jeers for the content...Knowledge is neutral, but misinformation is most always bad.

Lots of it in the video,

Cobbling together speculative statements and false analogies from people outside their field is hardly a scientific or compelling treatment. This amounted to little more than fear-mongering.

The atmosphere is like a bullet? Cells contain magnetite? Brain vibrations? So many facepalm moments.

Inexplicably absent: meteorologist, neuroscientist,  Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof.

Weigh the video against: http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4122, found through "debunkatron".

I enjoyed hearing Martin Sheen. Charlie might've been a better voiceover choice, however. ☺

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#2) On August 28, 2011 at 9:50 PM, lquadland10 (< 20) wrote:

Dear RetroAlum. The paranormal TV Chanel should have given you a clue. Then again it is just starting to be talked about. More is being looked into. If the sound waves could heal people then the pharma co. might not like it and fight. it. Same with depression. Think about the millions spent every year on that alone. It did give both sides. Just an old new technology.

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#3) On August 30, 2011 at 5:12 PM, RetroAlum (< 20) wrote:

Did you read the link? Hardly just starting to be talked about, "Angels Don't Play This HAARP" was published in 1995.

The problem with the argument "Big Pharma is suppressing simple cures" is that it can be applied to anything: Did you know that eating dirt cures cancer, they just don't want you to find out because it's free!.. It helps prove nothing.

The video definitely didn't give both sides. Statements from HAARP were heavily edited while the others spoke at length, making unsubstantiated claims.

I'd suggest reading up on logical fallacies. Argument from Antiquity is relevant, as are several flavors of Red Herring.

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#4) On September 02, 2011 at 12:13 PM, mhy729 (32.51) wrote:

Heh...the guy in the stillframe sort of looks like a nerdy version of Leo DiCaprio.

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