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TMFMmbop (35.30)

My Dad's Experiment with Shengmingsu

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September 23, 2010 – Comments (27)

Earlier this summer we got our hands on a few samples of Yongye International's Shengmingsu fertilizer product. In the interest of due diligence, I sent one to my master gardening father to test on his vegetable garden. Here's a photo of how it worked on his peppers in a controlled test. The bigger one is treated with Shengmingsu, so my dad was pretty happy with the product and its results.

27 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On September 23, 2010 at 10:46 AM, carcassgrinder1 (< 20) wrote:

Holy Crap...pleaase don't tell me that is a Jalepeno on the right...that's insane.

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#2) On September 23, 2010 at 11:05 AM, miteycasey (30.97) wrote:

It's a cucumber.

 

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#3) On September 23, 2010 at 11:11 AM, fthfool (95.18) wrote:

That's awesome! May I ask just how your dad got hold of the fertilizer. Is it in the web site of Yong?

 

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#4) On September 23, 2010 at 11:14 AM, TMFMmbop (35.30) wrote:

We requested samples from the company as part of our research process, and I passed a bottle along to him.

Tim Hanson

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#5) On September 23, 2010 at 11:24 AM, hometowninvestor (< 20) wrote:

Wow. Now this is due diligence.

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#6) On September 23, 2010 at 12:31 PM, carcassgrinder1 (< 20) wrote:

thanks mitey...that's absolutely hillarious...and very witty.

Seriously Mmbop...

Those do not look like the same breed of pepper....not calling it out...but i am curious.  As a chef and avid gardener...I am interested in the pepper variety we are looking at.  The one on the left looks closest to a Jalepeno(almost certain)...one on the right looks like an Aneheim or possibly Green Pepper.  The one on the left shows no exterior "rib" lines, while the one on the right has very defined ribs. 

If that fertilizer made a Jalepeno look like that... something is very wrong there.  Is the fert. organic?...or a melange of chemicals?

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#7) On September 23, 2010 at 12:38 PM, TMFMmbop (35.30) wrote:

Organic. Same jalepeno varietal according to my dad.

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#8) On September 23, 2010 at 12:51 PM, carcassgrinder1 (< 20) wrote:

Organic...awesome!!  Thanks for the info.

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#9) On September 23, 2010 at 12:54 PM, 07acuratls (< 20) wrote:

Is the left just a green bell pepper that has not grown as much as the Shengmingsu treated green bell pepper on the right?

Can someone confirm?  Or is the "pepper" on the left a jalepeno and the one on the right a frankenstein jalepeno after being Shengminsu treated?

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#10) On September 23, 2010 at 12:58 PM, TMFMmbop (35.30) wrote:

Both are jalepenos. The smaller fruit is from an untreated plant, while the larger is from a plant fertilized with Shengmingsu. Note, it's a very small sample size, but my dad intends to expand the experiment next year (like Chinese farmers, he is skeptical about introducing new products and does so slowly).

 

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#11) On September 23, 2010 at 1:00 PM, nola622 (< 20) wrote:

What dillution ratio did your dad use?  I have shengmingsu in the states also (brought it back in checked luggage) and it needs to be highly dilluted.  like 300:1 to 800:1 for different plant types.

 So, the other question is if a jalepeno like the one the right is desirable to anybody but the farmer getting paid by weight.

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#12) On September 23, 2010 at 1:12 PM, carcassgrinder1 (< 20) wrote:

nola...since jalepenos are generally sold by the pound...I can't imagine it helping the end user...other than the fact that you wouldn't have to cut and clean as many peppers to yeild the same usable amount.  But, can you imagine the fun with "stuffed" jalepenos you could have now!!

The acid used in the fert is extracted from coal...which seems a little weird...but i haven't done a ton of research into this...so it may be ok.

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#13) On September 23, 2010 at 1:14 PM, TMFMmbop (35.30) wrote:

Based on the instructional packet that was included with the product, we diluted 500:1 -- the recommended dosage for "diverse vegetables."

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#14) On September 23, 2010 at 1:23 PM, nola622 (< 20) wrote:

Sounds good, thanks.  I didn't get english language instructions, and I can't read Chinese characters.

 

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#15) On September 23, 2010 at 1:24 PM, TMFMmbop (35.30) wrote:

Neither did we, but our analyst Sean Sun translated for us.

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#16) On September 23, 2010 at 1:44 PM, rofgile (99.33) wrote:

Very strange that it appears to contain chemicals extracted from coal.  Be careful - much of coal biproducts (benzenes, etc) are very carcinogenic.  And lets just say, that I don't trust Chinese food products very much in the safety regard...

If you are really serious about this product, maybe you could have a lab test the substances using Mass Spectroscopy, and see if its really safe.  If its good, invest - if not, call the FDA to bust them.. 

 -Rof 

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#17) On September 23, 2010 at 1:44 PM, rofgile (99.33) wrote:

Very strange that it appears to contain chemicals extracted from coal.  Be careful - much of coal biproducts (benzenes, etc) are very carcinogenic.  And lets just say, that I don't trust Chinese food products very much in the safety regard...

If you are really serious about this product, maybe you could have a lab test the substances using Mass Spectroscopy, and see if its really safe.  If its good, invest - if not, call the FDA to bust them.. 

 -Rof 

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#18) On September 23, 2010 at 2:50 PM, 07acuratls (< 20) wrote:

Appreciate this initial empirical evidence. It's fantastic to actually have someone running tests like this.  Now to just get a larger sampling size!

Some other questions I would have, including what ROF suggested on the safety of  Shengmingsu since the fulvic acid is derived from lignite coal. 

Was the Shengmingsu jalepeno just as spicy as the smaller (and perhaps more concentrated version)?  Larger doesn't always mean better if taste or original purpose is diluted.

 

 

 

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#19) On September 23, 2010 at 3:28 PM, JonCroke (< 20) wrote:

Thanks MmBop -

Question for Dad - could he have harvested the Larger pepper earlier than the Smaller, at the size the Smaller is now?  (Quicker/Earlier to Market?!)

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#20) On September 23, 2010 at 4:15 PM, TMFHelical (98.98) wrote:

 

Coincedence??

 

TMFHelical

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#21) On September 23, 2010 at 9:49 PM, bluebare (35.25) wrote:

LOL.  Very cool, Tim.  Just waitin' for it to get in the vicinity of 6 again before loading back up with an oversized helping.

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#22) On September 24, 2010 at 5:57 AM, kurtshrout (< 20) wrote:

Rofgile, there is nothing to be so careful about.  Fulvic acid research has been worldwide and goes back decades; and Yongye's products have already been well-tested.  There is no carcinogenic risk or anything of the sort.  If you are interested, contact me via the Yahoo Message Board for YONG; and I will share a research review with you.

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#23) On September 24, 2010 at 7:25 AM, devoish (98.06) wrote:

Peppers will coontinue to produce as long as the weather is warm enough. The two peppers in the picture could have come from the same plant.

Presumably "Dad" is showing us reasonable representations of the results achieved growing with Shengmingsu and without.

I would also be interested in the results of using comparable fulvic acid products. Grandma Enggy, for instance from a quick google search.

Nothing can go in my organic farm that is not certified for organic use by the Northeast Organic Farmers Association.

Aged horse manure is fine and will increase the size of my peppers too. Fish emulsion as a nitrogen source will double the size of my leafy greens.

The USDA does not have standards for what can be labeled as "organic" fertilzer.

Waste sludge from waste water treatment plants is called organic. Despite the fact that it contains high levels of endocrine disrupters. Mother Jones reports.

NOFA has standards, as does the Organic Materials Research Institute.

I would love to see their product with the OMRI certified label on it.

 

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#24) On September 29, 2010 at 7:47 PM, hhead36 (< 20) wrote:

Size and beauty are great with produce, but how does the taste compare one to the other?  Does the big one lack flavor or 'heat'?  I notice produce from California is often tasteless compared to produce grown elsewhere.  Is this the case with papas peppers?

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#25) On October 13, 2010 at 6:42 PM, nuijel (< 20) wrote:

I agree with Devoish. It is nice to know that plants grow faster with fertilizer, but we kind of know that for 100+ years. So if the pepper grows as fast with horseshit, well, by owning YONG, we may not be sitting on a pile of gold but of something else.

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#26) On March 01, 2011 at 1:05 PM, charron22 (< 20) wrote:

Two different peppers The one of the left is Jalapeno, the one on the right anaheim

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#27) On March 10, 2011 at 12:55 PM, john795806 (< 20) wrote:

I believe that they are both of the same variety. As an avid gardener, I've had jalapeno peppers as large or larger than the one on the right. Given the right fertility, they can get quite large.

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