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goldminingXpert (29.50)

New York Unveils Bold New Health Care Solution

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March 10, 2009 – Comments (13)

Wait until you hear this one. Government, fighting ever escalating health care costs, laws down the law against a doctor who had the nerve to undercharge uninsured patients for treatment. Check this article out: Here's the first few paragraphs:

"New York, NY - The state is trying to shut down a New York City doctor's ambitious plan to treat uninsured patients for around $1,000 a year.

 

Dr. John Muney offers his patients everything from mammograms to mole removal at his AMG Medical Group clinics, which operate in all five boroughs.

 

"I'm trying to help uninsured people here," he said.

 

His patients agree to pay $79 a month for a year in return for unlimited office visits with a $10 co-pay.

 

But his plan landed him in the crosshairs of the state Insurance Department, which ordered him to drop his fixed-rate plan - which it claims is equivalent to an insurance policy"

Well, isn't that interesting. The government whines and moans about all the uninsured and then cracks down on any doctor who tries to help them. If you don't accept a socialist solution to our health care problems--well--shame on you! The message is clear, the government needs to get out of the way and let capitalism keep trying to fix our problems. The free market works, if you don't sue it.

 

13 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On March 10, 2009 at 5:08 PM, djemonk (< 20) wrote:

I live in New York City, and I have to say that the state of New York is probably the worst thing that ever happened to those of us who live here.  This kind of retarded sh*t is why so many people leave the city and move across the river to Jersey.

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#2) On March 10, 2009 at 11:01 PM, SuperPicks (29.01) wrote:

Who are the bastards in the NY State Insurance Department who put through that ridiculous order!?

Man, if I was living there, I'd be starting a mad-letter writing campaign & protests, targeting the specific representatives involved.

Ridiculous. 

Thx for sharing gmx. 

(btw I shorted bgz towards end of trading last friday...& still hanging on to my faz & skf shorts which finally went green today! =D)

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#3) On March 11, 2009 at 9:48 AM, BigFatBEAR (29.11) wrote:

Interesting - I have a good friend who is studying medicine at Harvard, and he basically says that the medical institution does ALL it can to prevent doctors from competing against each other, which is entirely un-economic. I never knew how correct he was, though!

Disturbing, especially for a city that's supposed to be on the cutting edge of everything.

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#4) On March 11, 2009 at 1:48 PM, jgseattle (30.23) wrote:

I hate to agree with a bad policy but the Dr is offering a form of insurance so he needs to follow the laws the regulate insurance.

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#5) On March 11, 2009 at 1:51 PM, russiangambit (29.32) wrote:

Insuarance Department is the state organization, right? It reminds me of franchise laws, where GM has to support its dealeres even at loss due to state franchise laws. And never mind that GM is bankrupt.

I think that lobbying on state level is even more pervasive than at federal, and often states undermine what the federal government is trying to do., like in the example here.

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#6) On March 11, 2009 at 2:01 PM, russiangambit (29.32) wrote:

> I hate to agree with a bad policy but the Dr is offering a form of insurance so he needs to follow the laws the regulate insurance.

No, he doesn't. The department needs to reconsider their regulations.

I see this in Russia all the time. When laws don't make sense, people go around them. The end result, complete disregard for the law and corruption of law enforcement, who purposefully hunt those people down and get the bribes.

The US is the great country it is because it has laws and people who generally respect them. Many do not realize it, but it is priceless and once the respect for the law is destroyed, it is almost impossible to get back.

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#7) On March 11, 2009 at 2:07 PM, Gingerbreadman55 (25.84) wrote:

"I hate to agree with a bad policy but the Dr is offering a form of insurance so he needs to follow the laws the regulate insurance."

Hmm. So my Sam's club membership that I pay qualifies as insurance by this logic then, right? You know, yearly fee with an upfront cost of what I buy to get into the place?

Just because something has been done a certain way for years doesn't make it right. I believe Thomas Paine's Common Sense outlines this in the first paragraph.

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#8) On March 11, 2009 at 3:53 PM, thismarketrox (99.73) wrote:

Sounds like a cash cow for the Doctor to me...how much does that $79 get you?  Medical costs are in tests and prescriptions not office visits.  Primary practice is not the money maker in medicine, it is the specialties and hospitals.  That $79 isn't going to pay for your pills, or your X-Rays, or your penicillin shot when you get Strep.  It isn't going to help you when you visit the ER at 10PM on Sunday because your kid can't breathe or is running 105 temperature.  It won't help when you get cancer or have a child or need a mammogram or have a heartattack.

 Primary practice is the solution to the other problems.  Of course if the US wasn't so overweight and was also more inclined to exercise, it wouldn't be such an issue.

 

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#9) On March 11, 2009 at 4:40 PM, russiangambit (29.32) wrote:

> Sounds like a cash cow for the Doctor to me...how much does that $79 get you?  Medical costs are in tests and prescriptions not office visits. 

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Are you serious? Try visiting a doctor without an insurance, they charge anywhere from $100-$200 dollars per visit. Minute clinic charges $50, but they know nothing, completely useless, at least, in my experience.

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#10) On March 11, 2009 at 4:50 PM, usmilitiadude (31.63) wrote:

I go to an osteopath that does adjustments like a chiropractor. He doesn't submit insurance and doesn't have a secretary. The price is reasonable ($40 as of two years ago) and he does a great job. He used to have a full medical practice but got tired of the paper work bs, insurance payment delays, and having a full staff. 

The doctor in the article needs to be left alone.

 

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#11) On March 12, 2009 at 10:49 AM, Crimsonpm (51.80) wrote:

Well naturally the insurance companies would get all upset. The medical markup market is great for them. I can't stand it when someone finds a workable way to fix a problem and then the inefficient want to stiffle it.

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#12) On March 12, 2009 at 6:48 PM, nevercanstop (< 20) wrote:

I lived in NY/NJ for 38 years.  When I got out of there it was like a lead weight was lifted off my shoulders.  The taxes, traffic, and government BS was unbearable.

I actually managed a medical office and owned another for 2 years in Maryland.  Sold my practice last October.  Saw Obama was going to get in and I know what that means for health care costs.  In my office we would treat the uninsured very well and cut their fees dramatically provided they paid via cash or cc at time of service.  It was worth it to take less, and have $0 collection cost on the account.  Collecting from private insurers and Medicare was a pain in the a$$.  You can't even beieve what it was like to collect from Maryland Medicaid - you wouldn't deal with the patients it was so bad.

Now living happily in FL.  The northeast and CA are going to go broke.  Unfortunately, with BO in the White House, he will want the rest of us to bail them out...

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#13) On March 14, 2009 at 12:53 AM, herztical (28.25) wrote:

...live in ny and not surprising at all, simple politics in play. Insurers carry alot of weight

This doc is great, cutout the middleman for routine stuff and keep insurers around for major medical. Heck major pharma should offer the same type plan for meds.

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