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HarryCarysGhost (99.70)

R.I.P Ron Santo 1940-2010

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December 04, 2010 – Comments (108) | RELATED TICKERS: C , UBS

Classic Ron Santo and Pat Hughes

Thanks for all the laughs and great memories Ronnie.

 I'm sure your in the hall of fame in the sky now.

 

108 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On December 04, 2010 at 12:35 AM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

I know this is not about investing, but since were doing Foolanthropy I did'nt feel bad about posting something off-topic.

One of Ron Santos main goals in life was raising money to find the cure for Juvenille Diabetes.

So I'm pretty sure he would approve of me trying to help children by posting here.

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#2) On December 04, 2010 at 12:54 AM, Momentum21 (95.21) wrote:

He loved the city of Chicago didn't he? He seemed like a classy guy even though I didn't really have much of a connection...other then growing up a Met fan which he would not have liked... : ) 

He might make the Hall of Fame yet...not that it really changes anything...  

And all the lies we subsidise
That just don't mean a thing
I've got to say he passed away in obscurity
And now all the vultures are coming down from the trees
So he's going to be in the gallery 

 

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#3) On December 04, 2010 at 1:33 AM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

other then growing up a Met fan

Momentum, I did'nt realize we were sworn mortal enemys...:)

JK

Yeah he was a classy guy always had time for the fans, and like I said the money he raised for JDRF is in the many millions.

The broadcasters that can make a game entertaining even when your team is losing seems to be a lost art. But with Harry Caray and Ron Santo I was able to listen to two of the best. (And yeah I've watched a lot of bad Cubs teams in my life :)

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#4) On December 04, 2010 at 2:56 AM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Since this for charity I've decided to go nuts for a hundred posts.

Please feel free to join in.

 

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#5) On December 04, 2010 at 3:03 AM, ajm101 (31.96) wrote:

http://espn.go.com/blog/sweetspot/post/_/id/6487/why-isnt-ron-santo-in-the-hall-of-fame

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#6) On December 04, 2010 at 3:07 AM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5n-jpRnRW8Y&feature=related

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#7) On December 04, 2010 at 3:31 AM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

ajm101

thanks for the post.

I've asked older dudes who have seen him play, and the consensus was he played a bit dirty and would show up the opponent at times.

So some of the players that vote held a grudge.But I think behind Brooks Robinson he was the best third baseman of the era.

Should have been in the Hall a long time ago.

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#8) On December 04, 2010 at 6:17 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

The following is from Ron Santo - a passionate, feisty Cub for life

Ron Kroichick

San Francisco Chronicle December 4, 2010 04:00 AM

Saturday, December 4, 2010



Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/12/03/SP4Q1GLJUE.DTL#ixzz178mRVfbj

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#9) On December 04, 2010 at 6:18 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

I am breaking it up a bit so that it can help toward 100 posts for Ron Santo. -

Friday's tributes to Ron Santo, the longtime Chicago Cubs third baseman and broadcaster who died Thursday, included many anecdotes about his long, colorful career in baseball. Here's my favorite, which you didn't read elsewhere:

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#10) On December 04, 2010 at 6:19 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

In the summer of 1989, I was working on a story about the 20-year anniversary of the 1969 season - the Miracle Mets/Collapsing Cubs - and reached Santo on his car phone as he drove along an Illinois tollway.

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#11) On December 04, 2010 at 6:21 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

It started as an innocuous conversation. But the more Santo reflected on how his Cubs infamously faltered down the stretch, and the Mets raced past them to win the National League East, the angrier he became.

His voice rose. Every other word was unprintable. Santo wanted to get back on the field - right now! - and play the last two months of the '69 season over again. He was steaming, over-the-top mad.

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#12) On December 04, 2010 at 6:22 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

It started as an innocuous conversation. But the more Santo reflected on how his Cubs infamously faltered down the stretch, and the Mets raced past them to win the National League East, the angrier he became.

His voice rose. Every other word was unprintable. Santo wanted to get back on the field - right now! - and play the last two months of the '69 season over again. He was steaming, over-the-top mad.

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#13) On December 04, 2010 at 6:23 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Suddenly, he lowered his voice and said, "Excuse me, I need to pay the toll."

I remember hearing the coins clatter into the basket.

And then he resumed raging, as if the interruption never happened.

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#14) On December 04, 2010 at 6:23 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

It was classic Santo, revealing his passion, feistiness and lingering bitterness over '69. No major-league player cared more for his pathetic, hopeless franchise than Santo did.

His loyalty to the Cubs showed during his unabashedly biased run in the radio booth. His distaste for the Mets also stretched beyond his playing days, especially when his hairpiece caught fire on a press-box heater at Shea Stadium.

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#15) On December 04, 2010 at 6:24 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Full disclosure: Santo was my favorite player growing up outside Chicago. I can still picture a Cubs jersey, with No. 10 on the back, hanging in my childhood closet. He played hard, hit homers and had the same first name - what else does a kid need?

That connection endures long past childhood. Longtime Giants fans no doubt feel a similar link to Willie Mays and Willie McCovey.

And it's cool when the athlete carries a fan's passion, not to mention the courage Santo showed in fighting diabetes and other ailments. He paid his tolls, too.



Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2010/12/03/SP4Q1GLJUE.DTL#ixzz178ofWnVZ

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#16) On December 04, 2010 at 6:34 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

The Chicago Sun-Times has the following Reds-related anecdote from Santo’s biography:

As a high school senior, Santo was chosen to play in the Hearst All-Star game in New York’s Polo Grounds in 1958. He was a catcher then, and despite a less than stellar game, scouts sought him out. A Yankees scout asked him to stay several days to work out in Yankee Stadium while a Cleveland Indians scout asked him to stop in Ohio to work out before returning home.

Santo instead went home to find his mother and stepfather, John Constantino, already swamped with calls from scouts for all 16 major league teams. He had offers of a $50,000 bonus to sign with the Indians, and $80,000 to sign with the Cincinnati Reds. “It was tempting,’’ Santo wrote. “I had grown up watching those Class AAA Rainiers, the farm club for the Reds. I knew the team. I had shined their shoes. I even had a tryout with the team when the big league Reds came to town to play their minor league counterparts in an exhibition game.’’

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#17) On December 04, 2010 at 6:36 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

For some reason, Santo held off, waiting for a call from the last major league club to make an offer–the Cubs.

“I had become pretty friendly with the Cubs scout, Dave Kosher, and I was confident he was going to come through,’’ Santo wrote.

But when Kosher did call, it was with bad news. “I know what you’ve been offered. We can’t even come close to your lowest offer,’’ he told Santo. “Bring [head scout Hard Rock Johnson] over anyway,’’ Santo answered.

The negotiations were blunt. “We know what you’ve been offered and we’re offering $20,000,’’ Johnson told Santo and his stepfather. “There’s no way you’re every going to be a third baseman in the major leagues, son,’’ he said. “Maybe you can make it as a catcher.’’

Santo drove an apologetic Kosher home, having already secretly made up his mind.

“Even though I grew up watching the Reds system, I had an affinity for the Cubs. I loved to watch Ernie Banks, and I was intrigued by the incredibly long dry spell they had had since their last championship,’’ Santo wrote. “And I believed I had a better chance of making it to the majors with the Cubs since they weren’t as rich in the talent department.’’

Santo’s stepfather left the decision to him. “My mind was made up. I was signing with the Cubs. To me, $20,000 was the same as $50,000 or $80,000. It was all a lot of money,’’ he wrote.

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#18) On December 04, 2010 at 6:39 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

ald Edward Santo (born February 25 1940 in Seattle, Washington) is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played almost his entire career with the Chicago Cubs. He was named a National League All-Star 9 times during his 15 seasons of play (1960 - 1974), and won five consecutive Gold Glove awards for fielding excellence (1964-1968).

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#19) On December 04, 2010 at 6:40 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Santo made his debut with the Cubs on June 26, 1960. He played with the team until 1973, then finished his career with the cross-town Chicago White Sox in 1974 which he called the worst year of his life. During his 14-season run with the Cubs, Santo hit 337 home runs; he was the first third baseman to hit over 300 home runs and win five Gold Gloves, a feat since matched by only Mike Schmidt, a Hall of Fame player.

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#20) On December 04, 2010 at 6:41 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

In 1966, in the midst of trying to break the Cubs' team consecutive-game hitting streak, Santo was sidelined for nearly two weeks following a beaning that fractured his cheekbone. When Santo returned (and broke the record) he was wearing an improvised ear-flap on his batting helmet in order to protect the injury. Earflaps have since become standard equipment on batting helmets.

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#21) On December 04, 2010 at 6:42 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

In the early years of his playing career, he carefully concealed the fact that he had Type 1 diabetes. He feared that had this information come out, he would be forced into retirement.

Because the methods of regulating dibates in the 70s were not as advanced as they are today, Santo would gauge his blood sugar levels based on his moods. If he felt his blood sugar was low, he would snack on a candy bar in the clubhouse.

As part of the publicity surrounding "Ron Santo Day" at Wrigley Field on August 28, 1971, he revealed his struggle with diabetes. He was diagnosed with this disease at the age of 18, and was given a life expectancy of 25 years. Santo has had both his legs amputated below the knee as a result of his diabetes: the right in 2001 and the left in 2002. In 2004, Santo and his battle against diabetes was the subject of a documentary, This Old Cub. The film was written, co-produced, and directed by Santo's son, Jeff.

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#22) On December 04, 2010 at 6:50 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Today, he is a Cubs broadcaster on WGN radio with play-by-play announcer Pat Hughes. He has also worked with Harry Caray, Thom Brennaman, Steve Stone, and Bob Brenly. Santo also briefly worked with Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers commentator Wayne Larrivee.

Work with diabetes Santo has been endorsing the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation's annual Ron Santo Walk to Cure Diabetes in Chicago since 1974, and has raised over $50 million for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF). In 2002, Santo was named the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation's "Person of the Year." Santo also inspired Bill Holden to walk 2,100 miles, from Arizona to Chicago, to raise $250,000 for diabetes research.[edit]Hall of fame aspirationsOn September 28, 2003, Santo's #10 was retired by the Cubs organization, making him the third player so honored behind his teammates Ernie Banks (#14) and Billy Williams (#26). Other prominent Cubs had worn number 10 after Santo's retirement, notably Dave Kingman and Leon Durham. The most recent wearer had been interim manager Bruce Kimm, just the previous year.

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#23) On December 04, 2010 at 6:51 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

In 2005, he came within eight votes of election to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee, and in 2007 he came within five votes. Bill James, arguably baseball's most respected statistical guru, feels Santo's elevation to the Hall of Fame is long overdue. Santo's next opportunity for admission will come in 2009.

Although disappointed at being bypassed, on the day his number was retired in 2003, the ever-optimistic "old Cub" told the cheering Wrigley crowd, "This is my Hall of Fame!"

In April, 2004 Santo was inducted into the inaugural class of the Washington Interscholasic Activities Association (Washington High School) Hall of Fame as a graduate of Seattle's Franklin High School. Broadcast careerRon Santo joined the Cubs' broadcast booth in 1990 as the WGN color commentator.

In Chicago, Santo is well-loved for his unabashed broadcast enthusiasm, which he reveals with groans and cheers during the game. He also possesses a charming sense of humor. During one game, in which Angel Echevarria was batting, Santo casually asked play-by-play broadcaster Pat Hughes, "Pat, do you believe in angels?" As excitable as Santo is when a great play for the Cubs occurs, he is equally as vocal in his displeasure, as is evidenced by his meltdown in 1998 when Brant Brown, who was playing left field, dropped a fly ball against Milwaukee during the team's successful run for the Wild Card. Ron also has been known to engage in discussions about his variety of toupees.

The last group of comments (18-23) are from the Biographicon and can be edited to add your favorite information or stories about Ron Santo.

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#24) On December 04, 2010 at 6:54 AM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

That was for the non-fans on CAPS that know the name sounds so familiar but don't know enough about Ron Santo to know why, and also for the baseball fans that don't know anything more about his life than that he played for and announced for the Cubs.

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#25) On December 04, 2010 at 11:03 AM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Old? cub fan here went to see Ron play for years in Chicago and St Louis (lived in Decatur IL). Followed him on radio for many years also. A good man that deserves much respect!

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#26) On December 04, 2010 at 11:47 AM, quandou123 wrote:

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#27) On December 04, 2010 at 1:35 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Mary thank you so much, I was'nt quite sure how I was going to get to 100 but with your help I'm already a quarter of the way there.

IMO you'll never find another broadcaster as passionate for his team as Mr. Santo. I'm really going to miss listening to him.

 

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#28) On December 04, 2010 at 1:51 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

thanks soycapital.

It must have been cool to watch so many great players.

Seems like the whole league was stacked with Hall of Famers, the list just goes on and on, and Ron Santo was right at the top with all the greats.

(and no I was'nt implying that people who saw him play were old, I just never got the chance to see him play :)

 

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#29) On December 04, 2010 at 1:54 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Thanks spambot,

It's nice to know that you care :)

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#30) On December 04, 2010 at 2:13 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Ernie Banks also great player of the time. Remember others?

The mad Hungarian pitcher for the cubs, forget his name.

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#31) On December 04, 2010 at 2:16 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Ron Wouldn’t Want Us Sad Long: Hughes

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#32) On December 04, 2010 at 2:20 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Chicago - Ron Santo died Thursday night at the age of 70, and Friday the entire Cubs Nation is mourning and remembering him.

Santo's radio colleague, Cubs play-by-play announcer Pat Hughes shared his memories of Santo.

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#33) On December 04, 2010 at 2:33 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

1969 Chicago Cubs Batting, Pitching, & Fielding Statistics ...

Soycapital, was it Holtzman. not sure if he was Hungarion or not.

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#34) On December 04, 2010 at 2:35 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Cub fans across the country today are mourning the loss of third baseman and beloved broadcaster Ron Santo.

But one man who’s feeling the loss especially hard today is Pat Hughes, his partner for 15 years in the booth at Wrigley Field and at ballparks all over the U.S.

In an interview with FOX Chicago News, Hughes today remembered Santo as a man who was like several people in one.

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#35) On December 04, 2010 at 2:41 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

There’s never been a guy quite like him,” Hughes said after discussing Santo’s legacy in the WGN-AM studios on Michigan Avenue.

Hughes says he first met Santo when he was calling games for the Milwaukee Brewers, while Santo was already part of the Cubs broadcast team.

“He was just very friendly, very down-to-earth,” Hughes said . “(Santo) didn't know me from Adam, but he treated me as an equal, he treated me with respect, and he had that friendly laugh about him and I thought, 'this is a great guy.'”

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#36) On December 04, 2010 at 2:45 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Later, on the eve of their first game as partners during Spring Training in 1996, Hughes remembers he took a call from Ron Santo.

“He called me where I was staying in Arizona and said, 'Pat, look, I know you're nervous, I know you're excited, just calm down, relax ... you're gonna be fine. You be yourself, I'll be myself, we'll have a lot of fun, and we're gonna be great.' But -- it was so generous of him to reach out to me before we started working, and I will never forget that.”

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#37) On December 04, 2010 at 2:49 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Hughes said Ron Santo was a “great partner” in the broadcast booth.

“Whatever I would say, he would pick up on it, he would run with it, and whatever you brought up he was always willing to discuss,” he said.

Hughes said even when there was a “wavelength issue” – when he thought he and Santo were talking about one thing and Santo went off on a tangent – the audience enjoyed it.

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#38) On December 04, 2010 at 2:53 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

“I know that I laughed every single day, every single day of 15 years, I laughed out loud ... I'm talking about good, soulful belly laughs working with Ron Santo, and he did too,” Hughes said. “I learned to laugh at myself from him, I learned how to handle physical problems that we all will experience as we get older, I learned how to battle through.”

Hughes saw the toll Santo’s diabetes and other health problems took on him in recent years, but says he still laughed and was in a good mood at the ballpark.

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#39) On December 04, 2010 at 2:56 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Hughes saw the toll Santo’s diabetes and other health problems took on him in recent years, but says he still laughed and was in a good mood at the ballpark.

“To be honest with you, I think broadcasting Cubs games kept him going the last five or six years of his life,” Hughes said. “I think that was one of the few things in his life that brought him joy. It made him feel useful, he loved the Cubs, he loved Wrigley, he loved Chicago, he loved the fans. So I think really being in the booth working the games was the best possible therapy for Ron Santo.”

When we asked his favorite memory of working with Ron Santo, Pat Hughes focused on one day: the day Santo’s number 10 jersey was retired, in an emotional ceremony at the end of the 2003 regular season, the day after the Cubs clinched the division.

“That in itself made it a special weekend,” Hughes recalled. “The next day, Ron Santo's number 10 is retired, and I was the MC.

“I was so proud just to be a part of it ... and even now I get a little emotional thinking about that, but that was an unbelievable weekend and one that will remain vivid in my mind for the rest of my life.”
Hughes said Ron Santo will have several enduring legacies, from his time as a ballplayer through to his work as a broadcaster, his charity work and his work as a spokesman for juvenile diabetes.

“Somebody said that a great man is someone who never really reminds us of anyone else, and boy, that's Ron Santo,” Hughes offered.

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#40) On December 04, 2010 at 3:05 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/s/santoro01.shtml

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#41) On December 04, 2010 at 3:13 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

15 Seasons

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#42) On December 04, 2010 at 3:15 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

2243 Games Played.

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#43) On December 04, 2010 at 3:19 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

1138 Runs

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#44) On December 04, 2010 at 3:21 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

2254 Hits.

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#45) On December 04, 2010 at 3:24 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

365 Doubles.

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#46) On December 04, 2010 at 3:26 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

67 Triples.

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#47) On December 04, 2010 at 3:27 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

342 Home Runs.

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#48) On December 04, 2010 at 3:28 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

1331 Runs Batted In.

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#49) On December 04, 2010 at 3:30 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

.277 Batting Average.

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#50) On December 04, 2010 at 3:33 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

.464 Slugging Percentage.

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#51) On December 04, 2010 at 3:35 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

3779 Total Bases.

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#52) On December 04, 2010 at 3:36 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

.954 Feilding Percentage.

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#53) On December 04, 2010 at 3:39 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Five Gold Gloves.

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#54) On December 04, 2010 at 3:40 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Nine All Star Games.

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#55) On December 04, 2010 at 3:44 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

If those are'nt HOF #'s I don't know what are.

(As, Ronnie would say) I mean C'MON!

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#56) On December 04, 2010 at 4:17 PM, Starfirenv (< 20) wrote:

Hey John- Here's my $.10. Internet is "spotty" at best down here. I'll try to post a pic if I can find Dan's "how to". G'luck this week. Regards.

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#57) On December 04, 2010 at 4:26 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Hey Mark,

Hope your having a great time.

Best of luck to you too.

Hopefully we both sneak into the playoffs.

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#58) On December 04, 2010 at 4:40 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Some of my favourite Ron Santo stories-

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#59) On December 04, 2010 at 4:46 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Ron Santo and Harry Caray - Related Indian ...

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#60) On December 04, 2010 at 5:15 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

CHICAGO GREAT RON SANTO DIES 

CHICAGO (AP) — Ron Santo's love for the Chicago Cubs stretched from his days as a standout third baseman who one season even jumped and clicked his heels to celebrate victories to the two decades he spent unabashedly pulling for his team as a broadcaster.

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#61) On December 04, 2010 at 5:17 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

As much as his passion for the Cubbies soothed their long-suffering fans, his play and work in the broadcast booth helped him, too, through tough times and serious ailments, including a bout with diabetes that cost him both legs below the knees. He called the Cubs, simply, his therapy.

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#62) On December 04, 2010 at 5:17 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Santo, who had finished his 21st season broadcasting the Cubs in September, died Thursday night in Arizona from complications of bladder cancer, according to the team and WGN Radio, his longtime employer. He was 70.

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#63) On December 04, 2010 at 5:17 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

"Ron was an inspiration to everyone as his life was defined by overcoming obstacles. It is a sad day for all of Chicago and everyone in the sports world," said Chicago Blackhawks president John McDonough, who spent 24 years in the Cubs organization as a marketing guru and later as president. "His incredible passion for the Cubs was unmatched. ... Although we collectively are grieving over his passing, we should also celebrate his incredible life."

A nine-time all-star in his 15-year career, Santo hit .277 with 2,254 hits, 342 home runs and 1,331 runs batted in. He also won the Gold Glove award five times.

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#64) On December 04, 2010 at 5:18 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Santo was widely regarded as one of the best players never to gain induction into the Hall of Fame. The quiet sadness with which he met the news year after year that he hadn't been inducted helped cement his relationship with the fans.

"What a great loss for the Cubs and Cubs fan everywhere. Ron was such a wonderful person and friend. It is so unfortunate that he never became a Hall of Famer, as he should have long ago," Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame broadcaster Marty Brennaman said.

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#65) On December 04, 2010 at 5:19 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Don Kessinger, who played shortstop with the Cubs from 1964-1975 and perhaps saw more of Santo's play at third base than anyone, said what he remembers most is how hard his teammate played every single day. He said Santo deserved to be in the Hall of Fame, and cannot understand why he was never voted in.

"It would have meant so much to Ron Santo to be elected," he said.

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#66) On December 04, 2010 at 5:20 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

The Cubs' new owner, Tom Ricketts, praised Santo for his loyalty, courage and sense of humor. Commissioner Bud Selig called Santo a "magnificent, consistent ballplayer" — and a friend.

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#67) On December 04, 2010 at 5:20 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

"Ron's playing and broadcasting careers shared a common thread: in both capacities, he was a staple of the Cubs' experience every single day," Selig said in a statement.

Santo never got to see his beloved Cubs win a World Series, something they haven't done since 1908, and their last appearance came in 1945, when Santo was 5. Yet he once said his association with the team probably prolonged his life.

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#68) On December 04, 2010 at 5:21 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Nothing brought fans closer to Santo — or caused critics to roll their eyes more — than his work in the radio booth, where he made it clear that nobody rooted harder for the Cubs and nobody took it harder when they lost. Santo's groans of "Oh, nooo!" and "It's bad" when something bad happened to the Cubs, sometimes just minutes after he shouting, "YES! YES!" or "ALL RIGHT!" became part of team lore as the "Cubbies" came up short year after year.

"The emotion for me is strictly the love I have for this team," Santo told The Associated Press in August 2009. "I want them to win so bad."

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#69) On December 04, 2010 at 5:23 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Oh! Just remembered this one.

Could'nt find a link so I'll have to go from memory. I was laughing so hard practcally in tears.

The Cubs Third baseman Aramis Rameriez had just came back from a hand injury sufferred by getting hit by a pitch.

So in his first game back at Pittsburgh the pirates put the replay of the injury on the jumbotron during his first at bat.

Ron Santo: ohhhh noooooo.

Pat Hughes: You thought he got hit again did'nt you ronnie.

Ron: (Laughing) yeah.

Pat: The fact that were in our away uniforms, and the injury happened at home, did'nt cross your mind.

Ron :(Still laughing) no.

I can't do it justice but that still cracks me up to this day.

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#70) On December 04, 2010 at 5:38 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

@HarryCarysGhost - I did not know Ron Santo other than as a familiar name.  If there is a sport that I follow, it would have to be football.  Also, I am in the south and cannot really say that I know the names of many people in baseball at all.

I respect the hard work and passion that go into playing ball at this level.  I have been learning as I sought articles and anecdotes about Ron Santo.  This is not the work of someone who just happens into a group of lesser players.  Ron Santo's life, in just the bare bones that I have read, is one of dedication to a city, to a ball club, to a sport.  They all received every ounce of fight that he had to give to them.

It is also the story of struggle, determination, and tremendous strength of character not to give up in the face of a medical condition that required constant monitoring, constant work to keep his body chemistry level and where it needed to be.  He had to become aware of internals in his physical well-being that most of us never pay any attention to. 

Above all, this is a man that I wish I had known.  He showed kindness, a sense of humor, a grace under pressure, and a composure in the face of disappointment that was the mark of a winner in much more than a sport.  I did not know this man or even really know of him, and I am still outraged that he is not in the Hall of Fame!  The Cubs fans are not the only ones to have suffered a loss with his passing.  Anyone whose life was touched by Santo must feel grief at his loss.

Thank you for your blog.  What began as an attempt to help you move toward your goal of 100 has given me some insight into a truly remarkable person.  It is a shame that I missed hearing him calling a game or three.

Mary

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#71) On December 04, 2010 at 5:42 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Ron Santo blog #71

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#72) On December 04, 2010 at 5:49 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

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#73) On December 04, 2010 at 5:52 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

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#74) On December 04, 2010 at 5:58 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

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#75) On December 04, 2010 at 5:59 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Thank you Mary.

You summed up my thoughts perfectly.

He was a remarkable man, who touched the lives of millions of people.

I think his lasting lecacy, will be if through his work  a cure for Juvenille Diabetes is found.

He was steadfast that a cure could be found. And his giving of hope and inspiration to those afflictted cannot be measured.

 

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#76) On December 04, 2010 at 5:59 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

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#77) On December 04, 2010 at 6:01 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

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#78) On December 04, 2010 at 6:03 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

And if the Cubs ever win the World Series for him,

That would be nice too...:) 

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#79) On December 04, 2010 at 6:03 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

+.10

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#80) On December 04, 2010 at 6:04 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

I really liked your links, so I put them here for everyone to see!

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#81) On December 04, 2010 at 6:06 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

 soycapital 

Was it Holtzman you were thinking of?

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#82) On December 04, 2010 at 7:02 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Steve Goodman: A Dying Cubs Fan's Last Request

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#83) On December 04, 2010 at 7:35 PM, blesto (31.90) wrote:

Foolanthropy on +1rec

Image and video hosting by TinyPic" target="_self">Ron Santo

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#84) On December 04, 2010 at 7:37 PM, whereaminow (22.35) wrote:

A total bummer. I have been a Cubs fan I was 4 years old.  I grew up about a mile and change from Wrigley Field and spent every summer at the park, before the ticket prices got out of control. You could pick up bleacher tickets on game day for a just a couple bucks.

I never was a big fan of Santo's "announcing." I have to use quotes because calling Santo an announcer would be a bit insulting.  He was a fan, like having a six year old in the booth.  My favorite Santo story is his reaction to Brant Brown's dropped fly ball late in the 1998 season.  After the game, Cubs manager Jim Riggleman had to console him because he was crying so hard.

That's a fan. 

I don't know if you posted it above. So hear is the famous "He dropped the ball" call.  Oh no!!!!!

(Comes at the 0:09 mark) 

 

David in Qatar 

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#85) On December 04, 2010 at 9:50 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

blesto,

Yep, why he is'nt in the HOF is beyond me.

And to add him posthumansley, just does'nt seem right.

But they probably will.

 

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#86) On December 04, 2010 at 9:53 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

http://articles.latimes.com/1992-07-15/sports/sp-3976_1_color-analyst

here is an article on the "mad hungarian", looking for some video or something. He put on quite a show, very good.

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#87) On December 04, 2010 at 9:55 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

http://www.slate.com/id/2139937/?nav=ais More on the mad relief pitcher.

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#88) On December 04, 2010 at 9:56 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

blesto,

Yep, why he is'nt in the HOF is beyond me.

And to add him posthumansley, just does'nt seem right.

But they probably will.

 

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#89) On December 04, 2010 at 10:02 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Hate is a good thing, as long as you keep it under control. When it comes out anger, you lose.

Alan Thomas "Al" Hrabosky
St. Louis Cardinals
Relief Pitcher
a.k.a. "The Mad Hungarian"

Guess he played for the cards also. He is an announcer now.

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#90) On December 04, 2010 at 10:07 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Al pitched for the Cardinals for eight years, and he wound up his 13-year major league career with stints with the Kansas City Royals and the Atlanta Braves. It was while pitching for the Cardinals that Al started planning for his life after baseball. He did some part-time sports work for a St. Louis TV station and later worked in radio when he was with the Braves. When he retired in the early 1980s, thanks to his Atlanta baseball contract that included several years of deferred salary, he was able to land a job with a regional baseball network owned by Anheuser-Busch.

“I offered to work for them and said, ‘Oh, by the way, you don’t have to pay me,’” Al said.

Al’s, shall we say, low compensation requirements made him an attractive hire. But instead of drawing the posh, major league assignments, he was sent to call minor league baseball games.

“That’s probably where I deserved to be at the time,” Al said.

But, funny thing, Al was pretty good. He wasn’t Red Barber right away, but who is? After kicking around for a few years doing fill-in work in St. Louis, Al in 1985 landed relatively permanent radio and TV assignments for the Cardinals. He’s been broadcasting St. Louis Cardinals baseball ever since and currently is a member of the Cardinals’ Fox Midwest broadcast team.

For the record, the Mad Hungarian was never really mad. Not then and certainly not now. Nope, mainly the Mad Hungarian is a nice guy, is what he is. A guy who will tease you a bit and allow himself to be teased back.

Oh sure, he’ll still flirt with your wife, but he’ll make you and your wife laugh when he does. And yes, if you’re a Cub fan, he might tease you with a quick joke or a gentle jab, but he’ll do it with a smile. And always with an underlying respect.

“I discovered a long time ago that it takes a lot more effort to be rude to someone than it does to treat someone with respect,” he said.

Yep, the Mad Hungarian is a nice guy. And smart.

I guess I got my facts confused, my bad, he was a cardinal relief pitcher!

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#91) On December 04, 2010 at 10:12 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Sorry that I tarnished your Cubs blog with a Cardinal pitcher! lol He was a character that I'll never forget. With that fu man chu and long hair he would first stare down the batter with an intimidating stare like you have never seen. Then he would turn his back to the plate and at the same time rare back and throw a 95 mph fast ball on the inside corner chest high like he was aiming at your heart with an arrow or something.

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#92) On December 04, 2010 at 10:14 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Sorry for the double post.

 

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#93) On December 04, 2010 at 10:16 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

My brother has a baseball signed by that cubs team in the late sixties, not sure exact year but I know Ernie Banks and Ron Santo and Billy Williams is on there!

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#94) On December 04, 2010 at 10:19 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

I remember Mom would take us kids down town to the hotel where the teams would come after the game and they would often visit and sign autographs there. Got to see them face to face. Memory pretty fuzzy exactly who we met but it was during that period of late 60's.

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#95) On December 04, 2010 at 10:22 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

We'd get the whole family in the old station wagon and head to either St Louis or Chicago to watch a cub/cards game. Great memories. Especially Wrigley field.

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#96) On December 04, 2010 at 10:22 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

You will certainly get your 100 comments to this blog, HCG...And Ron is, without a doubt, on a much more stellar roster at the moment - an eternal Hall of Fame where his talent, work, and passion are recognized.  Thanks for the education in a totally new field.  I have enjoyed it immensely!

Mary

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#97) On December 04, 2010 at 10:25 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Hello Harry? congrats!

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#98) On December 04, 2010 at 10:27 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

I got to learn a lot more about Ron Santo and brought back some very good memories! Thanks......

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#99) On December 04, 2010 at 10:28 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

soycapital

That's fine that you choose to tarnish my blog with your soiled Cardinal red :)

But for now I would like to focus on Ron Santo and all the great things he accomplished in life.

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#100) On December 04, 2010 at 10:53 PM, blesto (31.90) wrote:

And plus 10 more cents for Foolanthropy.

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#101) On December 04, 2010 at 10:55 PM, blesto (31.90) wrote:

LOL!

I just noticed I got #100!

+ 10 more cnts.

LOL!

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#102) On December 04, 2010 at 11:25 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

 

My computor was acting goofy, so I was'nt able to post the 100th post, which my freind blesto so swiftly picked up :)

David, I remember going to games when bleachers were six bucks and when I was of drinking age it was ten.

But they slowly but surely, priced me out.

I have to say it was a great time to be young and single.

Soycapital, I'm glad I brought back some memories

no doubt that was the golden age of baseball.(I've seen footage of Bob Gibson, man his stuff was wicked)

And Mary I have you to thank most of all.

I never would have got to 100 without you. And I'm glad you know what kind of person he was .

And to Ronnie,

When, your playing the annual Heavan Vs Hell Matchup

Watch out for Ty Cobb, he likes to lead with his spikes:)

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#103) On December 05, 2010 at 11:41 AM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dQPiCi38po

$10.30 for Foolanthropy.

And I got to pay my respects to a man I very much admire.

How cool is that,

Thanks to TheMotleyFool for making this possible.

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#104) On December 05, 2010 at 1:07 PM, hanginout (73.20) wrote:

Harry, this is for you.  I am proud that you met your goal - and very aware that you added as many comments as everyone else combined.  Somehow, I think Ron would be very pleased that he had a friend and fan that was as proud of him as he was of his beloved team! 

 

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#105) On December 10, 2010 at 4:53 PM, djshagggyd (73.62) wrote:

 

"Cynics could mock and logical folks could build scientific arguments to show how misguided Santo's faith was, but it never defeated or even deterred the man. Santo had hope. And whether you're talking about the Cubs, diabetes or whatever burdens you face, hope is a wonderful thing to have." -Burt Constable 

 

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#106) On December 10, 2010 at 8:30 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Hey Justin,

Long time no type.

It's always great to hear from you, and I like the Constable quote.

I don't know if you've seen it but I left a message on your last blog

Neutral Tandem: TNDM (is giving me a headache)

Looks like my legal wrangling has paid off in that preposterus fraud of a case the feds were conducting : )

I still check out Facing Winters website every once in a while. But have'nt been to a show since moneys a bit tight. My last blog explains this. But I will see you again my freind (can't believe I forgot to give you my e-mail Doh!)

Well hope everything is going good on your front, things are good on mine.

And I'd like to wish you and yours a Merry Chistmas and a happy and prosperous New Year.

John.

 

 

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#107) On December 16, 2010 at 1:23 PM, djshagggyd (73.62) wrote:

John,

Ah dang it...

I actually responded (in hilarious fashion) to the comment you left on my blog... it was last week sometime... but I must have forgotten to hit "post" after the preview or something... because I don't see it there now.

Either that, or the Federalis saw it and deemed it inappropriate for exposure to the American public. Yeah... that's probably it.

Anyway, I'm at work and don't have much time to read or type at the moment... but I hope you're doin' well friend!

Hit me up sometime at theband(at)facingwinter(dot)com with your email address and I'll respond via email with my contact info. You, Jeff, and I should meet up for a beer sometime.

Merry Christmas!

~justin 

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#108) On December 16, 2010 at 9:55 PM, HarryCarysGhost (99.70) wrote:

Either that, or the Federalis saw it and deemed it inappropriate for exposure to the American public. Yeah... that's probably it.

Those Bastards, no worries I have ways of dealing with the likes of them.

Hit me up sometime at theband(at)facingwinter(dot)com with your email address and I'll respond via email with my contact info. You, Jeff, and I should meet up for a beer sometime.

Will do.

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