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TMFKris (88.14)

Sign the media is sinking further?

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March 18, 2010 – Comments (3)

I've seen several media sites lately illustrating stories using photos of women in bikinis; stories that have dubious connections to bikini-wearers. Even Merriam-Webster's online dictionary has had an entry highlighted on its main page illustrated with a bikini top (sans woman) and a bikini-clad woman. Something to do with words derived from place names. CNN right now has a beach scene (bikinis, of course) with camels. The story's about culture clash, so you could argue it's an appropriate photo.

I am sorry to see news outlets sinking to this gratuitous level in an attempt to attract readers and viewers. A certain kind of media is dying; does it want to be buried wearing a bikini? 

Kris (TMF copyeditor)

 

3 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On March 18, 2010 at 4:05 PM, Tastylunch (29.22) wrote:

does it want to be buried wearing a bikini? 

It just doesn't want to be buried. It'd rather wear a bikini in a desperation than be buried

the media outlets here locally are in big trouble. they've laid off so many reporterts that they basically just print press releases. The ones that remain get their stories off twitter because they don't have the time to go in the field and search.

Some stations/papers are using cameramen and photgraphers as reporters now too...

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#2) On March 18, 2010 at 4:33 PM, TMFKris (88.14) wrote:

@Tastylunch

Excellent point. As a former reporter and editor for a local daily in VT/NH I'll have to think about what I would accept in order to help my employer stay alive. I think losing local papers is going to be so harmful in the long run.

Ads on the front page? Printing gory details of how someone was killed? Reporting juicy divorces cases b/c the records are public? Puff pieces on big advertisers?

What's the line between doing what you have to survive and upholding the integrity of journalism? Or maybe the integrity ship sailed long ago. The current competitive environment certainly puts it on the run.

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#3) On March 18, 2010 at 5:16 PM, Tastylunch (29.22) wrote:

-I think losing local papers is going to be so harmful in the long run. 

Oh I completely agree. It's one thing to have creative destruction, but only if what is destroyed is replaced.

I'd argue what is being destroyed by the media dieing is verfied and edited information. As much as I love me some blogs and whatnot, I'd rather they be supplemental instead of the only info out there. There's just no oversight over their content which is their blessing and curse.

unfortunately the only media outlets doing well now seem to be of the infotainment variety.

-What's the line between doing what you have to survive and upholding the integrity of journalism?

I don't know but it needs to be answered. If you want to see what happens to city when they lose their paper just ask Ann Arbor, Michigan

from what friends up there tell me, nearly every store, bank and restaurants' business is falling dramatically because now they lost a pillar advertising mechanisms other than direct mail now that their only paper went online only... ValPak and RedPlum have been dropping zip codes too...

the guys who seem to be getting most hurt by this are the independent shops and restaurants...as the Nationals have other channels

perhaps they've bounced back by now, dunno. It's been awhile since I asked.

I do think most small suburban style papers will be alright at least for a good long while longer. The information they offer is not really available on the interwebs yet.

It's medium to big city papers and tv stations that I think are toast. Killed by a twin killing of losing classifieds and losing ownership of how people receive their news.

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