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Solar Oven Makes Clean Drinking Water from Salt Water

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September 14, 2012 – Comments (2)

This is extremely useful for so much of the world (since a large percentage of the world's population lives along ocean coastline) and can be made low cost from abundant materials. This is good bridge technology until Dr. Nocera's 'synthetic leaf' comes into mass production: http://caps.fool.com/Blogs/the-first-practical-artificial/733510

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Solar Oven Makes Clean Drinking Water from Salt Water
Megan Treacy
Technology / Clean Technology
September 11, 2012
http://www.treehugger.com/clean-technology/solar-oven-makes-clean-drinking-water-salt-water.html



As a graduate student, Italian designer Gabrielle Diamanti's travels exposed him to the global water crisis and the issue became a fascination for him. Fortunately he's been able to use his skills as a designer to create something that could make a big difference for those with little access to clean water. The Eliodomestico is an open source design for what is essentially a solar still, but with thoughtful details to make it even more functional and easy to use for those in coastal areas where salt water is abundant, but fresh water isn't.

Technology doesn't always have to be complicated, sometimes the simplest materials and concepts are the best. The Eliodomestico works like an upside-down coffee percolator to desalinate salt water. The ceramic oven has three main pieces. The top black container is where the salt water is poured. As the sun heats the salt water and creates steam, the pressure that builds pushes the steam through a pipe in the middle section. The steam condenses against the lid of the basin at the bottom and then drips into the basin, where it is collected.

The oven can make about five liters of fresh water a day.

The design can be built for about $50 and although Diamanit used terracotta for his prototypes, local craftsmen can use whatever materials are most abundant where they live. The basin is also designed to be comfortably carried on the head, which is common in sub-Saharan Africa and other places around the world. ....

2 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On September 18, 2012 at 3:35 PM, Mary953 (79.30) wrote:

Fantastic Binve!  This surpasses the economic ups and downs of stocks and goes toward saving the lives of those who need pure drinking water to survive.

Belated happy birthday to the Binvette - they are wonderful, aren't they?

 

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#2) On September 18, 2012 at 4:19 PM, binve (< 20) wrote:

Hey Mary! Exactly. I love stories like these. Thanks! Yeah, binvette just turned 3, and she is just growing up so fast :) She is the light of my life :)

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