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oknoworries (47.37)

thank you SEC, awesome job

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November 07, 2013 – Comments (15)

Props to the SEC for protecting the rich people, so they could get the actual $26 IPO price;  way to protect the little guy; good job.   same old  different day   lol

15 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On November 07, 2013 at 3:56 PM, Turfscape (42.55) wrote:

I'm trying to figure out if someone (perhaps an SEC employee) had promised you $TWTR shares at $26?

Or is it that your last name is either Goldman or Sachs and you were led to believe that you were actually underwriting this IPO and are upset because 70 million shares didn't show up in your mailbox last night?

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#2) On November 07, 2013 at 5:05 PM, HarryCaraysGhost (99.60) wrote:

I thought you were joking in these blogs. Now that I see that your serious my first question is-

Why do you want to own an unprofitable company?

After answering that the second question is-

What's the rush?

Usually when the smoke clears from the irrational exuberance of an IPO, the stock settles around the IPO price.

Deep breath.....ommmmmmmmmnn!

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#3) On November 07, 2013 at 6:22 PM, Mega (99.97) wrote:

I'm sure the SEC is extremely sad that they weren't able to get oknoworries the TWTR price that he deserved.

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#4) On November 07, 2013 at 6:46 PM, awallejr (75.87) wrote:

Let's see they have 544million shares.  They IPO only 70 million and over 113 million shares traded for the day.  No wonder Main Street hates Wall Street.  They knew stock was going to trade near 50. They take a little less into the corporate coffers but everyone given those 70 million shares were handed it at basically an instant double.

If you are going to IPO the company then IPO all of it and not this piecemeal manipulation.  I swear what snakes.

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#5) On November 07, 2013 at 7:30 PM, oknoworries (47.37) wrote:

Ok, I understand now.  The experienced investor has found the positions that make playing the market a less stressful and more enjoyable activity.  I need some coaching.  Perhaps some illustrations of positions I could take in the market would be helpful.  What positions should I take, so I can ride through the bad times with the market and still have a fulfilling pleasurable experience? 

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#6) On November 07, 2013 at 7:53 PM, Mary953 (79.07) wrote:

Too much football...When I saw the title of your post, my first thought was SEC as in SouthEastern Conference.  This time of year especially, it is good to the have the vast majority of my funds with a trusted investment counselor (Note the emphasis here is on TRUSTED)  And I did more due diligence finding him than I have ever done on ANY stock that I have ever owned.  

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#7) On November 07, 2013 at 7:56 PM, HarryCaraysGhost (99.60) wrote:

What positions should I take, so I can ride through the bad times with the market and still have a fulfilling pleasurable experience

Avoid the grab your ankles positions like twitter.

Go missionary with dividend aristocrats, nice and slow.

..Ohhhhh Yeeeahhh!

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#8) On November 07, 2013 at 8:26 PM, oknoworries (47.37) wrote:

Harry

thanks for your guidance on positions.  I really want to have more control in a mutual experience, rather than let the market have it's way with me.

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#9) On November 08, 2013 at 8:50 AM, ryanalexanderson (< 20) wrote:

+1 to HarryCarys - both for the advice, and the thoughtful analogy with which it was presented. 

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#10) On November 08, 2013 at 11:03 AM, Teacherman1 (26.53) wrote:

oknoworries

If you want to play the "slot machines", than buy some of NES while they have an "overshoot" to the downside.

They "bit the bullet" and cleaned up their balance sheet with big write downs, and are doing a 10 for 1 reverse split in the next month or so.

You will need to be willing to hold and not panic, but in the longer term, this will pay off.

I am long NES and added a significant amount this morning.

JMO and worth exactly what I am charging for it.

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#11) On November 08, 2013 at 11:27 AM, Turfscape (42.55) wrote:

The absolute best thing you can do for a pleasurable investing experience is to make sure you buy companies...not stocks. In other words, make sure you are buying something with purpose. Like others have asked, why would you have wanted to buy Twitter? My guess is because you probably thought the stock price would shoot up (due to the fact that it's Twitter and everybody and their grandmother heard all about this IPO for weeks, if not months). But, what would the purpose be? Buy a stock with the sense that you are buying into a company as a business owner. If you keep that mindset, you'll be more likely to seek out strong companies with decent valuations that will reward you with strong returns over the long-term.

If you're wondering what you can do for a pleasurable investing experience that gives you the chance at big money really fast...try Las Vegas. You'll lose money either way, but the drinks are free in Vegas.

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#12) On November 08, 2013 at 2:28 PM, ikkyu2 (99.10) wrote:

You're not an 'experienced' investor, oknoworries, so you are not supposed to be able to take a profit in the market.  You are inexperienced.  Go suffer some losses; if you lose enough money, couple dozen million or so, then maybe you'll be experienced enough to get in on the next IPO.

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#13) On November 08, 2013 at 2:45 PM, Mary953 (79.07) wrote:

Now y'all are just being flippant when I know you are a group of gentlemen.  You have, after all, answered all my questions so kindly over the years and taught me a great deal.  I have asked questions that went straight past interesting and appropriate and went straight to dumb (or even downright stupid - especially at first!) I didn't know that this was the way things worked until Facebook's IPO but no one gave me this type of grief.  Goodness!

And, Harry, about a couple of those comments:  I should be greatly offended by them.  Please pretend that I was.  *sigh* 

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#14) On November 08, 2013 at 6:50 PM, awallejr (75.87) wrote:

Put 20% of your portfolio in each of the following: AINV, BBEP, KKR, XRX and the balance in speculation plays.  Also you can sell puts to generate additionally income.  Note comment #2 for XRX plays in this thread:

http://caps.fool.com/Blogs/selling-puts/884307

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#15) On November 13, 2013 at 12:19 AM, jiltin (33.48) wrote:

Turfscape,

I see your point as well as Awallejr suggestion, keep it long term. It may take for me or new comer to go thorugh the investing experience (like   ikkyu2 pointed learn by experience ).

Here is the dillemma - a beginners one - what I have.  I am a lover of TSLA, a new innovation electric car replacing the gas powered. It is difficult to beat the innovator by any race until someone exceeds. It takes time and money for the competitor to superseed the innovator. As a long term view, I still value the company.

However, market forces hyped or excessively bought situation, bringing down the price drastically. When such situation happens, holding stocks is a big issue until someone gets sessioned.

For my case, I bought at 41,but sold partially at 91 and 110. I bought those again at 168 and sold 181.5. Now waiting for next oppotunity. Exactly on the results day, I was very much confused whether to hold or sell.

Finally, I took a decision, come what may, let me sell it at 181.5. Hindsight, I find it correct. But, scared to step in now.

It is real life scenario, with 200 shares, and I feel very tense with such volatile situation.

Similarly, I had 200 SCTY. All I sold on the same day. 

I pull out stocks with the fear of losing money.

How can I overcome and get seasoned player? 

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