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KDakotaFund (24.05)

This Is Definitely Worth 4 Minutes of Your Time

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54

December 16, 2010 – Comments (13)

Professor Hans Rosling is a sword-swallower. Crazy, I know. But as freakish and mesmerizing as that talent may be, the data that he has been compiling about developing countries is even more mesmerizing, and I promise it will surprise even the most worldly and well traveled among us.

Rosling has an uncanny ability to take enormous heaps of data, crunch the numbers, and present them in such a fluid way that it would make the most disinterested viewer sit up and take notice, and his focus on developing countries shatters a lot of misconceptions.

In the video below, Rosling charts a moving 200-year history of the wealth and life expectancy of 200 countries. In just 4-minutes, he shows that the gap between developing countries and developed countries is actually rather small, and that places like Shanghai, Taiwan, South Korea, and Singapore have already caught up with the west.

13 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On December 16, 2010 at 4:28 PM, tekennedy (70.45) wrote:

+1 Rec absolutely worth watching

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#2) On December 16, 2010 at 4:31 PM, TMFFlightsuit (< 20) wrote:

This is precisely the type of information that helps reduce the noise we encounter on the daily news cycle and helps increase true perspective.

Thank you for sharing.

-Nick

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#3) On December 16, 2010 at 5:16 PM, TMFCrocoStimpy (95.11) wrote:

That was really cool - I completely agree with TMFFlightsuit that this is the kind of thing that helps to get us to step back from the frantic view of the moment/day/month/year/decade.

-Stimpy

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#4) On December 16, 2010 at 6:31 PM, soycapital (< 20) wrote:

Pretty amazing presentation! Well worth watching!

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#5) On December 16, 2010 at 10:59 PM, Bays (30.45) wrote:

Nice!

 

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#6) On December 16, 2010 at 11:42 PM, checklist34 (99.72) wrote:

emerging market consumers is a potentially viable macro thesis, folks

but guess what?  its good for everybody

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#7) On December 16, 2010 at 11:54 PM, SkinneeJ (27.88) wrote:

More!  More!  More!!!

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#8) On December 17, 2010 at 6:15 AM, dwot (75.87) wrote:

Very good. 

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#9) On December 17, 2010 at 7:48 AM, drgroup (69.07) wrote:

Did this guy just awake from a coma? I can't believe he spent all that time to bring his awareness to the level of the obvious. We all should receive grant money to spend on researching nonsense...

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#10) On December 17, 2010 at 9:57 AM, TCWeaver (99.85) wrote:

Superior 1 rec

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#11) On December 17, 2010 at 10:50 AM, MoneyWorksforMe (< 20) wrote:

Excellent presentation. 

But if everyone is getting wealthier doesn't that mean that everything will cost more? So increased overall wealth does not correspond to increased living standards--a very important distinction.

Age and incomes may increase for most nations, but the standard of living will simultaneously decrease for those who are already considered the "healthiest and wealthiest." 

This is a long term positive trend for the world as a whole, but developed nations, in particular the U.S. will have great difficulty in accepting lower living standards. The transitional period, which I believe is accelerating at this very moment will be very tumultuous as western nations ardently fight to resist this change.

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#12) On December 17, 2010 at 12:17 PM, workfor (< 20) wrote:

+1 rec

However I would like to see the inverse relationship on the host (planet). Eventually, like a cancer, mankind may consume all the resources he needs for his very continuation or survival if you will. What then... more cells (planets) to consume? Just maybe.

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#13) On December 17, 2010 at 9:56 PM, PaxtorReborn (29.60) wrote:

Doesn't appear to adjust for inflation.......

Otherwise, very cool!

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