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Turning Point in Egypt

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February 10, 2011 – Comments (37)

If you believe in the power of prayer, you might want to start right now.

Mubarak will not step down. Protesters are marching toward the Presidential Palace.

This could be the beginning of Egyptian Civil War or a massacre like Tianemen (sp?) Square.

David in Qatar

37 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On February 10, 2011 at 4:51 PM, jesusfreakinco (28.87) wrote:

I agree.  Most Americans will be happy to watch American Idol and have no clue of the significance of what is happening in Egypt.  I think we are seeing a further decline of American influence.  Mubarak just gave a major snub of the US and its influence.  Surely this means they have they support of the Saudi's.  If this means the Saudi's have dissed the US admin, then Katie barr the door.  We could see $150 oil in the next few weeks and broad selling of treasuries IMO.

Print Ben Print... Print Ben Print... 

Got gold and silver?  Turk calling for hyperinflation:

http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/KWN_DailyWeb/Entries/2011/2/10_Turk_-_Silver_Backwardation_for_Years,_Possible_Hyperinflation.html

Many reports of severe backwardation in silver market.  Is gold next?

 

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#2) On February 10, 2011 at 4:56 PM, jesusfreakinco (28.87) wrote:

Saudi Arabia supporting Egypt - article

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#3) On February 10, 2011 at 4:58 PM, whereaminow (26.80) wrote:

jesusfreakinco,

It's been reported that the Saudis have offered to support his regime financially should Obama cut off funding.

Of course, my initial reaction is "sounds great!"

But this also shows how vulnerable the Saudis feel right now. They must view a free Egypt as a tremendous threat to their power. 

It's like dominoes. Should Egypt fall, Yemen, Jordan, Syria... what's left to keep the Saudi people from revolting as well?

And you are very right that there are major global financial implications, in particular for the US dollar.

David in Qatar

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#4) On February 10, 2011 at 5:24 PM, checklist34 (99.71) wrote:

not downplaying the significance of what you are saying here, but...

what, if anything, would be bullish for the dollar? 

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#5) On February 10, 2011 at 5:28 PM, whereaminow (26.80) wrote:

checklist34,

what, if anything, would be bullish for the dollar? 

Less of them. 

David in Qatar

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#6) On February 10, 2011 at 6:08 PM, alstry (35.43) wrote:

This is not about Egypt.....merely a symptom just like many thought housing was limited to sub prime.....

The world is bankrupt.....governments are corrupt......and the people are mad as hell in many places as food and fuel prices outpace wages.....

Think of this as if we are in the third inning of a game that is likely to go on for a long long time

How do you think the American people are going to react when they realize that their government, by bailing out Wall Street and NOT mainstreet, bailed out the companies that are outsourcing their jobs and their technology?

...and that they still live on mainstreet?

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#7) On February 10, 2011 at 6:29 PM, whereaminow (26.80) wrote:

alstry,

Agreed. I'm a big picture kind of a guy, but right now I'm fascinated by what is happening in Egypt.

Tomorrow, Friday prayers will let out around noon local.

It's going to be a hell of a day.

David in Qatar

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#8) On February 10, 2011 at 6:32 PM, ChrisGraley (29.86) wrote:

I'm trying to imagine what's going through the mind of the average Egyptian right now.

What the army does next determines the fate of the whole country.

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#9) On February 10, 2011 at 6:56 PM, whereaminow (26.80) wrote:

Chris

What the army does next determines the fate of the whole country.

Earlier today, a top Army official appeared in Tahrir square to tell the protesters that Mubarak would be stepping down, that the Army supported the people, and that all their demands would be met.

But now this. So now what?  I'm with you. The Army is key.  And I have absolutely no idea what is going to happen next.

Did you catch the crowds' reaction to Mubarak's speech? That was an amazing sight.

David in Qatar

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#10) On February 10, 2011 at 6:58 PM, alstry (35.43) wrote:

Chris...

Whatever is going on in Egypt will soon be going on all over the World.

We are globalizing....the world is shrinking....so we are going to have to think bigger.....

it is why I created udderworld.com......it will be a new era for humanity as technology replaces the need for human labor and there is not many areas to replace the people with.....

right now the world is functioning on a legal fraud....it simply wasn't sustainable.

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#11) On February 10, 2011 at 7:31 PM, jesusfreakinco (28.87) wrote:

David in Qatar

Thanks for your perspective.

#5 Less of them.

So true.  If us Americans would understand the facts about the Bernank, and his friends at JP Morgan and GS, we'd be rioting in Washington and NY.  Ignorance is bliss for some while the elites destroy our country.

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#12) On February 10, 2011 at 7:41 PM, ChrisGraley (29.86) wrote:

David,

The army was also supposed to make a second statement about 2 hours ago.

I think that they are figuring out their next step right now and they have until about dawn to figure it out.

Alstry most governments promote legal fraud. Then they get toppled and the next government promotes new and different legal fraud.

Power and greed are fruits growing on the same vine. You cannot feed one without feeding the other.

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#13) On February 10, 2011 at 8:43 PM, bg11235 (28.83) wrote:

Lots of unknowns still in Egypt. One known: There are some brave folks out there sticking their necks way out for what they believe in.

Contagion is unlikely but still a major fat tail risk. No contagion to the US though. We have the opportunity for regime change every two years when we go to the polls, and the best we can do for a third way are jokers like the Tea Party, Ross Perot, and Ralph Nader.

Crisis helps the US dollar because it will increase demand for US currency, which will soak up some of the excess liquidity coming of the printing presses.

 

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#14) On February 10, 2011 at 9:02 PM, ChrisGraley (29.86) wrote:

bg11235,

Contagion in the Middle East is huge! That risk is very huge for the US as well, in the fact that a lot of the dictators people are rallying against are supported by the US. We will lose some control in the ME and that's probably a good thing. The loss of that control will further weaken the dollar. Even if we did isolate this to just Egypt, an Egyptian conflict will send oil prices higher and gold prices will move in tandem. I don't see anything bulish for the dollar out of this. Maybe the Swiss Franc, but not the dollar.

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#15) On February 11, 2011 at 12:56 AM, checklist34 (99.71) wrote:

if aliens landed, would that crush the dollar?

I could try to meet some and make it all happen

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#16) On February 11, 2011 at 2:21 AM, whereaminow (26.80) wrote:

if aliens landed, would that crush the dollar?

I suppose if they landed on a big pile of it.  How many more Kilkenney's should I drink to engage this conversation on your level?

David in Qatar 

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#17) On February 11, 2011 at 3:56 AM, DarthMaul09 (29.80) wrote:

Even if there is a transition to a military government with adequate support from the people how will they build their economy back up again to support such a large population of poorly employed workers?  They might get some temporary support from the Saudi's but a life support machine is not a cure.

Niall Ferguson: Empires on the Edge of Chaos

 

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#18) On February 11, 2011 at 5:33 AM, ath002 (< 20) wrote:

David,

Your reply in #5) is a classic.

Thanks,

L

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#19) On February 11, 2011 at 11:15 AM, checklist34 (99.71) wrote:

lol david.  just having a little fun pointing out that the gold club is a wee bit obsessed with the imminent collapse of the dollar and find signs of it everywhere. 

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#20) On February 11, 2011 at 11:20 AM, checklist34 (99.71) wrote:

and WRT "less of them", thats exactly what we've been getting for some time now with a contracting M3. 

:)

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#21) On February 11, 2011 at 11:37 AM, drgroup (69.11) wrote:

If the muslim botherhood can rally less than 100k protesters to overthrow the Egyptian govenrment how many will they need to overthrow the US government? This event is a Mojavi desert test field for future take overs around the world. Who is next? 

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#22) On February 11, 2011 at 12:22 PM, Jbay76 (< 20) wrote:

I guess the people won after all, at least for the moment...


David, what are your thoughts now that the power is in the hands of the defense minister Tantawi?

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#23) On February 11, 2011 at 12:39 PM, SkepticalOx (99.43) wrote:

#21 If the muslim botherhood can rally less than 100k protesters to overthrow the Egyptian govenrment how many will they need to overthrow the US government? This event is a Mojavi desert test field for future take overs around the world. Who is next? 

Why you are even referring to the Muslim Brotherhood is beyond me. Did you not read or watch anything that went on in the past 2 weeks. The Muslim Brotherhood were only a little part of the protests.  

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#24) On February 11, 2011 at 12:52 PM, leohaas (32.95) wrote:

Congrat to the Egyptians! Now let the Egyptians decide what kind of future they want for Egypt. Maybe we as Americans need to stay out of this...

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#25) On February 11, 2011 at 1:26 PM, drgroup (69.11) wrote:

#23: Why you are even referring to the Muslim Brotherhood is beyond me.

You are right, they just dropped by to see what was going on and got caught up in the moment; innocent bystanders.

ps: my thoughts are the product of what CNN and the National Securty director Clapper reported. It is amazing how a secular group like the botherhood are misunderstood....

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#26) On February 11, 2011 at 1:34 PM, SkepticalOx (99.43) wrote:

#25 

Dude. They aren't innocent bystandards, but your post essentially stated as if they were responsible for the entire protest. They were a part of it and not the main force behind the protest. The Muslim Brotherhood is NOT a secular group but an Islamist group.  

 

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#27) On February 11, 2011 at 1:37 PM, SkepticalOx (99.43) wrote:

And CNN really? If you were really watching CNN, many of the talking heads made it abundantly clear that the Muslim Brotherhood were only a minor part of the revolution and would garner only minority support.

I don't know if you're being sarcastic or what. 

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#28) On February 11, 2011 at 1:43 PM, drgroup (69.11) wrote:

The Muslim Brotherhood is NOT a secular group but an Islamist group.

Glad to see you are aware of this, now call the National Security chief and advise him that moronic babbling description of who the botherhood is needs to amended to the fact. He said it......

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#29) On February 11, 2011 at 1:55 PM, drgroup (69.11) wrote:

the Muslim Brotherhood were only a minor part of the revolution and would garner only minority support.

If this is the true, why would obama have closed meetings with these people? They won't have any impact so why bother.....

 whereaminow.... I'm not trying to hijack your well written post, apologies.

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#30) On February 11, 2011 at 2:01 PM, SkepticalOx (99.43) wrote:

If this is the true, why would obama have closed meetings with these people? They won't have any impact so why bother.....

I don't understand how you're connecting the dots.

Uh... Because they aren't the leaders of the protests! Come on man. You really haven't been keeping tabs on what's been going on have you? The protests was largely leaderless and largely secular. 

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#31) On February 11, 2011 at 2:04 PM, SkepticalOx (99.43) wrote:

Whoops. Read your post wrong... They are a part of it. Your post implied that the protest were all Muslim Brotherhood. The fact is that they sort of tagged on after it started.

Really. Please show me where you read that the Muslim Brotherhood was the major organization the planned, started, and ran the protests, and that they were the main force behind it? Please?

 

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#32) On February 11, 2011 at 2:45 PM, drgroup (69.11) wrote:

Please show me

I can't show you the back of the sun, but it exist. If you have to be shown this after all the times it has been talked about in the media, you will never believe it. You can continue to keep your head buried in the sand and ignore the brotherhood's' key role here, but it doesn't change the facts. You show me were it is'nt written. This game is easy to play....

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#33) On February 11, 2011 at 3:20 PM, SkepticalOx (99.43) wrote:

You thought the Muslim Brotherhood was a secular group, so really... You have your facts confused.

Your initial comment implied that the Muslim Brotherhood was the main planner of these protests. They are not. Yes, they are an important part of it, I never denied that, but they are not the major force behind it. It's not black and white. Most of the pieces and talking heads have been along the lines of the Muslim Brotherhood is NOT the primary force behind protests... kinda like this piece: 

"But here’s the real deal, at least as many Egyptians see it. Ever since its founding in 1928 as a rival to Western-inspired nationalist movements that had failed to free Egypt from foreign powers, the Muslim Brotherhood has tried to revive Islamic power. Yet in 83 years it has botched every opportunity. In Egypt today, the Brotherhood counts perhaps some 100,000 adherents out of a population of over 80 million. And its failure to support the initial uprising in Cairo on Jan. 25 has made it marginal to the spirit of revolt now spreading through the Arab world." [source].

The early days of the protests focused mainly on young Egyptians using Facebook and Twitter to spread the protest. Almost everything coming out of CNN (which you claimed to have watch), centers around the premise that the protesters are diverse, from those poor to middle class folks with good internet skills - and that even if there were elections today, the Muslim Brotherhood would not even come close to a majority. Prominent figures in the protests such as El-Baradei (which the Brotherhood initially threw it's support behind), are considered to be secular figures.

I'm not trying to play a game here. You are. You're making up facts out of thin air and until you can back it up with something.

It's getting frustrating replying to you as you seem to have ignored everything in a variety of media sources. I'm done.

 

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#34) On February 11, 2011 at 4:19 PM, drgroup (69.11) wrote:

 SkepticalOx...   just a friendly word of advise, you are wound way to tight and should relax a bit. Referencing other peoples opinions and views dose not necessarily add credibility to you position especially on topics open to personal opinion. Later....

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#35) On February 11, 2011 at 5:32 PM, leohaas (32.95) wrote:

SkepticalOx, you got baited by the guy/girl who also opines that:

"The fact that GE owns NBC/Comcast opens the possibility that you will see Obama's face on tv every 3 seconds, campaigning for re-election." (Click here)

"Last night I went to bed in America and woke today in an unknown fascist country run by a dictator." (Click here)

Who would take anything he/she is saying seriously?

Again, congrats to the Egyptians. What they do is THEIR business, not ours.

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#36) On February 11, 2011 at 5:53 PM, whereaminow (26.80) wrote:

ALCON,

I wanna say thanks for the discussion. It's been a great day.

As leohaas said, and I am in complete agreement,

congrats to the Egyptians. What they do is THEIR business, not ours. 

Well said, Leo!!!!

I also want to share how proud I am of the Egyptian people for refraining from violence, for refusing to be baited, and for standing their ground.

This is the model for non-violent resistance to dictatorship.

David in Qatar

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#37) On February 14, 2011 at 10:16 AM, drgroup (69.11) wrote:

 #34-35....

Who would take anything he/she is saying seriously?

My opinions are fruit for thought and to be taken any way you like. Contrasted to your politically correct, brown nosing, un original regurgitated tirades. Being the product of a closed mind limits your perception of reality. Just read some of your past post, they all sound the same, not one original thought in any of them...

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