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alstry (35.79)

We Are Simply Starving The Private Sector

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June 22, 2010 – Comments (2)

When you cut off credit/money to the citizens/private sector but give unlimited credit/money to government and select bankers.....pretty soon the government and bankers can buy whatever they want the the citizens/private sector shut down.

IT IS SIMPLY WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A BUNCH OF ENGLISH MAJORS TRY TO ANALYZE A TICKER AND NOT FOCUS ON PRODUCTION AND WHO OWNS PRODUCTION.

At the end of the day stocks, bonds, money and gold are simply derivitives of production....and right now our college grads, construction workers and massive numbers of unemployed are simply not producing.

It  is about time for government to get those folks back to producing as the rich, retired, and welfare recipients are providing no service to our nation's progress.  Further, if we are not producing, our nation collapses.

Get ready for a massive war or compulsory civil service in exchange for food vouchers and shelter.....after all government is already handing out food vouchers to 40,000,000 people and owns the mortgages on most of the homes in America.

It is simply the Digital Age.....Welcome.

2 Comments – Post Your Own

#1) On June 22, 2010 at 2:40 PM, alstry (35.79) wrote:

At the end of the say, the analysis is simple:

WHO OWNS AMERICA'S PRODUCTION?

The Government?  The Bankers?  The Producers Themselves? ....or the Welfare, Unemployed, and Food Stamp Recipients? ....or the Retired/Social Security Recipients?

The outcome is convulsive.....

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#2) On June 22, 2010 at 3:14 PM, XMFSinchiruna (27.51) wrote:

http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=101401&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1440601&highlight=

From CMC's Q3 earnings:

"Public works remained the most active end-use market; commercial and industrial markets continue to be plagued by high unemployment, illiquidity, high vacancy rates, and suboptimal manufacturing utilization."

"The nonresidential construction market in the U.S. should continue to be relatively good in the public sector; however, the private sector is likely to remain weak."

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